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Grass Skis Are Just What They Sound Like…Kind Of

Where is your helmet my guy? Bryceskiteam.org photo.

The rush we get from riding two planks downhill is incomparable: the muscles we use, the aerodynamics, and the smooth glide and carve into the snow. So when summer inevitably comes, not having the white stuff to fulfill the euphoria we crave from skiing is a grim reality check that seasons do, in fact, exist.

RELATED: WTF Candide!? Is This Real Life?

But have you ever thought about getting creative and skiing on grass? It may solve all of your ski withdrawal problems. 

What do these two photos have in common? Honestly, not that much other than helmet, goggles, ski suit, and poles. Grass USA Inc. Facebook photo.

We use the term “skiing” on grass lightly, as the kit itself is alien to the skiing we are familiar with: the devices are much shorter and move on a set of wheels.

Grass skiing began as a training method for alpine skiers in the 1960s in Europe, but it has evolved into a sport of its own accord and spread across the world, according to Grasski USA

Slalom skiing on grass? Alrighty then. Grass USA Inc. Facebook photo. 

The International Ski Federation adopted grass skiing as a legitimate sport in 1980, coining it “Track-Roll,” but others refer to it as roller skiing. 

It was featured in Warren Miller's 1984 "Ski Country," complete with a stellar soundtrack for the segment.

The sport has been around for a while, to say the least. Your parents have probably tried it.

So if you are looking to keep those ski muscles intact for the winter season while also getting that same downhill adrenaline, maybe you should look into using a pair of skis that are fully functional on grass. Just be prepared to look like a Jerry while doing it. 

We're not too sure we can really call them skis...we prefer the term “ski blading on wheels.”

Would you give them a shot?

Looks like these two are about to hit a long stretch of sidewalk for a day of rollerblading. But they're actually going skiing....kinda. Grasski USA Inc. Facebook photo.

Just had a pair of those in our shop!

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Watch: Sage Cattabriga-Alosa’s Full Elemental Film
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Watch: Sage Cattabriga-Alosa’s Full Elemental Film

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ELEMENTAL from Sage Cattabriga-Alosa on Vimeo. Sage Cattabriga-Alosa rips. Whether it is BC pillows, unimaginably large Alaskan spine faces, or desert freeriding, he puts his mark on a mountain face like a true master. Wait, desert freeriding? Like on bikes? Yup. For those of you that haven’t figured this part out yet, Sage is quite the accomplished mountain biker. Living in the two-wheeled hotbed of Bend, Oregon surely helps, but hanging out and riding with professional mountain bikers

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Teton SAR Make Their Second Rescue of the Season
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For the second time in as many days, Teton County Search and Rescue responded to a call from an injured skier Saturday afternoon, reports the Jackson Hole News & Guide. The 36-year-old managed to get his “ski tips [stuck] in the snow, and hit his head and crashed pretty hard,” said Teton County Undersheriff Matt Carr who also mentioned that the man was “complaining of a head injury and some pain in his spinal area.” The patient was retrieved via helicopter, transferred to an ambulance and

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Explore the Pioneer Legacy of Alberta’s SkiBig3
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Story by Matt Coté If this were Instagram, the scene before me might seem cliché. My ski tips dangle over a cornice while a steep, blue spine screams back up in the key of ecstatic tension. ER3 is one of Lake Louise Ski Resort’s marquee big-mountain lines in what feels like an endless amphitheater of cascading geology. The Canadian Rockies are some of the youngest mountains on the planet, and the Earth’s strata are on display like it’s been dissected. If I turn 180 degrees though,