Sign In:

×

Last Step!

Please enter your public display name and a secure password.

Plan to post in the forums? Change your default forum handle here!

×
×

Trump Administration Announces $256M for NPS Infrastructure

The saying “loved to death” has become a popular way to refer to the NPS, which struggles to cope with their crumbling infrastructure amidst increasing visitation. Katie Lozancich Photo.

Last Wednesday, the Trump Administration announced some uplifting news for the National Park Service: $256 million of funding to go towards revitalizing park infrastructure.

The funding is a momentary reprieve for the NPS, who is currently inundated with $11 billion in backlogged maintenance. According to a press release from the Department of Interior, the money will be spread between 22 different parks and monuments.

While it might not be noticeable to all who visit the country's national parks, the roads, trails, waterways, and campgrounds at many of the parks across the United States have been in decline. Even the most minute of things—drinking fountains or bathrooms—demand some quality TLC.

The funding will address different needs for each location. For example, in Yellowstone, about $21 million will be put towards rehabbing the Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel guest room wings, whereas in Yosemite roughly the same amount will be used for rehabilitating the Wawona Wastewater Treatment Plant.

RELATED: Our National Parks are worth $35B, Let’s Try to Protect Them

The announcement follows last year’s huge visitation levels—330 million recorded across all parks. With this year expected to surpass that, making any sort of progress in regards to the upkeep is imperative for the Park Service to thrive.

"The President is a builder, he loves to build and he loves our National Parks, so it is a natural fit that the Administration is dedicating so much attention to rebuilding our aging parks infrastructure. These approved projects are more than just line items on an Excel spreadsheet,” stated Secretary of Interior Ryan Zinke in a press release.

“They have a tangible effect on a person’s experience when visiting our nation’s parks," Zinke continued. "Today’s announcement is another step toward eliminating the more than $11 billion in maintenance facing the National Park Service.”

The backlogged maintenance has been one of Zinke’s most pressing problems since taking his role in 2017. While this funding will only make a small dent in the situation, it’s a step in the right direction.

Play
READ THE STORY
UPDATE: 1 Dead, 1 Critically Injured in Taos Inbounds Slide
Up Next News

UPDATE: 1 Dead, 1 Critically Injured in Taos Inbounds Slide

UPDATE: 1 Dead, 1 Critically Injured in Taos Inbounds Slide

UPDATE: One skier who was recovered from the slide debris died Thursday evening in a Taos hospital. The other remains in critical condition in an Albuquerque hospital. Our thoughts are with the family and friends of the victims.  An avalanche buried several skiers at New Mexico’s Taos Ski Resort Thursday morning. According to the Taos News, the slide occurred in the K3 chute off the resort’s famed Kachina Peak. Two male skiers were extracted from the debris, revived using

Play
READ THE STORY
Sierra Cement Tips Private Jet at Truckee Tahoe Airport
Up Next News

Sierra Cement Tips Private Jet at Truckee Tahoe Airport

Sierra Cement Tips Private Jet at Truckee Tahoe Airport

Thanks to an atmospheric river sitting on top of California, the Sierra received a considerable amount of new snow. Turns out lots of snow isn’t always good news, that is if you own a private jet. According to the Sacramento Bee, fresh snow piled on the back of a Cessna Citation X jet at the Truckee Tahoe Airport on Wednesday, ultimately tipping it on its tail. Well, there’s a reason why its called “Sierra Cement”. At least conditions look much better in the mountains, with resorts

Play
READ THE STORY
Two Stranded Hikers Rescued in Yosemite
Up Next News

Two Stranded Hikers Rescued in Yosemite

Two Stranded Hikers Rescued in Yosemite

Two British hikers were rescued in extremely steep terrain in Yosemite early Wednesday morning, just as heavy snowfall was materializing. According to rescue reports, the two hiked up the Yosemite Falls trail, planned to descend the Snow Creek Trail, but got lost around snowline and accidentally started descending a steep dead-end gully as darkness fell. RELATED: 1 Dead, 1 Critically Injured in Taos Inbounds Avalanche Luckily, they were able to place a 911 call, and Yosemite Search and