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Abandoned Soviet Bunker in Fagerkulla

I had a tough week, basically trying to survive on 4-5 hours of sleep for every night, due to travel and meetings. I had talked about possibly exploring something with my friend Jarmo on Saturday. But by the time I woke up, it was already afternoon...

And Jarmo was hiking in some forest. We were able to arrange a meet up, however, so that he could continue with me to a bunker in the same direction that he was at.

The bunker in Fagerkulla didn't look like much. A concrete slab visible from the small road going by it.

One difference was the warning rope around the bunker, indicating a fall danger. That was possibly a good sign, if somebody can fall in, then perhaps we could climb in.

As we have explored bunkers around the Soviet occupied territory of Kirkkonummi, almost all of them have been of the standard small model. We had only run three times to the ZIF-25, larger two-story model that housed a 110mm gun. In one case the larger bunker was completely inaccessible with all entrances blocked. In two other cases they were so badly damaged that we either did not dare to enter beyond the entrance corridor, or too destroyed to understand their inner setup.

But we finally found an accessible ZIF-25 here in Fagerkulla! Blown up internally, but, reasonably easily accessed. We had to climb down to the entrance corridor from a small crack, and then walk down a pile of dirt to the lower level, and under hanging pieces of concrete to get the main room.

The ZIF-25 gun room is on the top floor, and underneath was likely storage space. The floor in between was gone, but now the big room was easily visited. On the entrance side of the bunker there was two floors as well, the entrance corridor, another corridor underneath, and two small rooms on top of each other. Here the walls were not entirely gone, so we could see the structure, and walk around a bit.

This blog is also available on Blogspot. Tämä blogi löytyy myös suomeksi Relaasta. Photos and videos (c) 2017 by Jarmo Ruuth and Jari Arkko. All rights reserved. The song "The Framework" by Jingle Punks, freely usable from YouTube audio library.

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