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Evil’s Brand-New Wreckoning Might Be The Bike That Can Do it All

After weeks of teasing a new bike, Evil finally dropped the all-new Wreckoning, a long-travel 29er do-it-all dirt smasher. Now in its latest iteration, the Wreckoning sports all the refinements we’ve come to expect from a 2020 bike with updated geometry that still stays true to the plush yet poppy nature Evil bikes have been known for. The bike was developed with heavy input from riders like Accomplice athletes Graham Agassiz and Paul Genovese, and their riding alone should be a testament to how much this bike can rip. In other words, it can handle everything from epic singletrack rides to competing at Red Bull Rampage. How’s that for versatility?

RELATED: Check Out New Bikes From Commencal, Transition, and Yeti

Now for some details on this gravity fiend:

The Wreckoning is designed to be as multitalented and customizable as bikes get, with geometry adjust chips and the ability to run anywhere from a 160mm to a 190mm fork, including a dual-crown option, like Aggy. The stock frame options all come with Rockshox Super Deluxe Ultimate coil shocks. The one-piece rear triangle features the new(ish) 157mm Super Boost axle standard, adding stiffness for when it gets

Aggy doing Aggy things on the new Wreckoning. Mason Mashon photo.

Geometry-wise, we’re looking at the following numbers, based around 166mm of rear travel and either 160mm or 170mm fork. In a nutshell, it’s slack, but not too slack, and still features the super-short rear end Evils are known for, making the bike as playful as a dirt jumper.

Complete bikes start at $5,799 with options including both SRAM and Shimano drivetrains and the new Rockshox ZEB fork across the board.

Get the new  Evil Wreckoning here.

Aggy doing more Aggy things. Mason Mashon photo.

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