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Thread: Classic Films

  1. #76
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    Saw that one a few months back on our over the air rerun channel noir night. Uncle Bill brought the menace! Great noir flick

  2. #77
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    SUDDEN FEAR - 1952
    Here’s another melodramatic noir mash-up.
    Taking place largely in San Francisco (though those familiar with The City may notice some inconsistencies as some of it was also filmed in Los Angeles), this is a tawdry tale of faux romance and swindle.
    Joan Crawford mesmerizes with a wide range of emotions, Jack Palance’s chin commands the screen, and Gloria Graham is a moll to end all molls.
    Some great camera work, interesting use of reflections in mirrors, and cool shots of feet help create the necessary noir look.
    I was a little disappointed with the ending, though; it’s a bit abrupt.

    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

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  3. #78
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    THE PHILADELPHIA STORY
    What a great romcom featuring a devilishly charming Cary Grant, a whirlwind Katherine Hepburn, a rough-and-gruff Jimmy Stewart, and classically cool Ruth Hussey.
    Based on the successful Broadway play of the same name, it’s a fast and furious satire of high society, marriage, and social mores.
    The dialogue is sharp and witty and rolls off actors tongues so fast that I found myself hitting rewind with certain frequency.
    Highly recommended.

    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

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  4. #79
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    THE GAZEBO
    While visiting my 90-y/o pops this week, he and I stumbled upon this this 1959 black comedy of errors via late night TCM.
    It is a ribald send-up of Hitchcock-styled macabre mayhem (Hitch is even name dropped at one point in the film).
    The cast is fantastic, with Glenn Ford in a wonderfully understated comedic role as a semi-bumbling screenwriter married to the bubbly Debbie Reynolds with engaging side characters played by Carl Reiner and John McGiver.
    Goofy and fun.

    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

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  5. #80
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    GOLD DIGGERS OF 1935
    The first film fully directed by legendary choreographer Bugsby Berkeley comes out the gate with an opening sequence that is mesmerizingly brilliant. It then lags a bit with a loose narrative about entitled rich people summering at an exclusive resort hotel. The characters are broad and goofy featuring the miserly millionaire, the lushed-out playboy, the absent-minded idiot savant millionaire, a few gold diggers, and a couple of conmen. The narrative is mainly there as the loose glue holding the musical numbers together. And, honestly, after the wonderfully stylized and highly synchronized opening sequence one could easily fast-forward to the two main song and dance numbers and be perfectly fine.
    The first is a lavish waltz teeming with a menagerie of white gown clad women and grand pianos. The scope and intricate production are kind of mind-blowing, given the time this was made.
    The crowning moment, however, is the “Lullaby of Broadway” number. A blitzkrieg of tap dancing and massively choreographed mayhem it is not only propelled by the movie’s catchiest tune, but by the sheer insanity of the dance numbers.
    Even if you don’t enjoy musicals, one has to admire the scope of Berekely’s dance numbers and all of the camera tricks he employed which were groundbreaking for the time and are now commonplace in every genre of film.

    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

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  6. #81
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    REBECCA - Alfred Hitchcock (1940)
    Hitch’s first Hollywood production is a whiz bang psychological gothic drama with a smidge of inverted whodunnit mystery and the specter of a ghost story tossed in for good measure.
    Teeming with a fantastic cast, both the leads are fantastic, but the supporting cast is filled with plenty of scene stealing goodness, too!
    The film is also rife with Hitchcock’s signature look (great lighting and use of shadows, immaculate staging and set design, etc.).
    The story and pacing are excellent, as well, but it’s Hitchcock’s mastery of creating tension and uncomfortable moments that linger and get under your skin which really propels the film; there are several scenes where the viewer easily guesses the outcome, but Hitch strings us along with so much tension and anticipation that it boils over into a kind of anxiety as we wait for it all to unravel.
    A number of critics have made a big deal about some potentially subversive lesbian undertones, but I didn’t see them in that way upon my initial viewing. I found the character in question to be creepy in the classically gothic manner, but also to be sad and unhappy, if not jealous; it just proves that one can interpret a film in a number of ways.
    Other critics have pointed out the this film may very well have influenced Orson Welles’s Citizen Kane. That I can see to some degree.
    In the end, this is just a damn entertaining and compellingly immersive motion picture.

    FYI, don’t let the trailer fool you as the film is far more intense and mysterious than it implies.

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  7. #82
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    THE GREAT MCGINTY - (1940) written & directed by Preston Sturges
    Yogachick turned me on to Preston Sturges a few years ago. I’m still slow on watching his films, but the ones I’ve seen, like this one, are stellar (I also highly recommend Sullivan’s Travels, which I reviewed in the now defunct Criterion thread and neglected to save a copy of the review on my computer!).
    But we’re here to talk about The Great McGinty. The film is a political satire teeming with a fantastic cast, snappy dialogue, and subdued, yet pointed socio-political commentary all of which seem to be PS’s hallmarks.
    This particular film is a ribald tale of an ambitious and headstrong bum who rises up through the political ranks. It’s funny, poignant, and well crafted.

    Here’s the TCM page with a smattering of interesting goodies:
    http://www.tcm.com/video/491211/grea...-suit-got-you/

    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

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  8. #83
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    NIGHTS OF CABIRIA - Federico Fellini (1957)
    The first Fellini film I ever saw was 8 1/2, which, at the time, I found its avant garde demeanor to be bloated and convoluted; it didn’t endure me to the revered director at all and I forwent watching any of his other films.
    Last year I broke my abstinence and checked out La Strada, one of his earlier films, and its neo-realism was much more to my liking.
    This film, another of his early ventures, follows suit, delivering what on the surface seems like an aimless slice-of-life look at an rebellious prostitute, albeit with just a hint of fairy taleness lurking underneath. Wrestling with a restless joy and out-of-reach melancholy, the film is propelled by a tour de force performance from Fellini’s wife, Giulietta Masina.
    Highly recommended.

    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

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  9. #84
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    THE PUBLIC ENEMY - 1931
    This early James Cagney film is an interesting watch. It commences with a message from Warner Brothers stating that the film is not meant to glorify gangsters. Yet the film wavers between being a cautionary, moralistic tale and glorifying the violent lifestyle of Prohibition era thugs.
    It’s also interesting in terms of its delivery, which is essentially short scenes broken up by fade-outs/fade-ins and then strung together into a linear story; I am not sure if this was the style of the day or a result of primitive camera equipment, but it lends the film a rather clunky, erratic flow.
    I also don’t get the hype around Jean Harlow, who stars as Cagney’s love interest. She is lauded as one of the greats of the Golden Era of Hollywood, but I found her acting to be poor and her voice (at least in this film) is annoying, filled with lurching accent changes and a weird shrill tonality. The lower billed Joan Blondell is much more to my liking.
    But the real draw here is Cagney, whose swagger and onscreen charisma carries the somewhat rote rise-and-fall storyline. To say that he is mesmerizing and a joy to watch would be an understatement; here he makes simple gestures like titling his cap or smiling seem almost transcendent. And the supporting cast of character actors are wonderfull. Edward Woods, Leslie Fenton, the aforementioned Blondell, Robert O’Conner, and Murray Kinnel all shine and add depth and nuance to the familiar story.
    In the end this is Cagney’s vehicle and he’s the reason it’s a fun ride.




    Last edited by dookeyXXX; 09-28-2023 at 08:41 AM.
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  10. #85
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    BABY FACE
    Caught this 1933 pre-code melodrama today with my folks, who go to a weekly film club at a small theater in St. Helena.
    The moderator chooses a theme for the month and this month it’s the films of Barbara Stanwyk (not sure why he didn’t go with “Noirvember” for the month’s theme…although he is screening Double Indemnity next week).
    This is basically the story of a man-eating small town girl and her climb to the top by any means necessary (in this case sleeping around). Everything is hinted at via salacious innuendo and Stanwyk’s character is painted as an amoral gold digger.
    It’s an interesting watch given the rise of MeToo and how you read the screenplay is up for debate: is Stanwyk’s character a slut or merely an ambitious individual? How would a male character be viewed if placed in the same role? These are but a few of the questions the film raises.
    Great dialogue and some very cool visual storytelling devices make this an entertaining endeavor that ultimately has some intriguing social commentary buried between the frames.

    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

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  11. #86
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    Great movie.

    Some of the innuendo is down right raunchy. Definitely caught me off guard lol.

  12. #87
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    CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN
    So, I am visiting the 'rents for TG. My pops is an avowed TCM fanboy; he literally watches the channel everyday and is pretty indiscriminate about what he's watching (I think I have only seen him turn it off/switch the channel only a handful of times over the years).
    At any rate on Wednesday we caught the tail end of The Parallax View and then we watched Being There. I felt that parts of the latter don't hold up too well, but I love the ending.
    But I digress.
    Last night, post TG dinner, we caught about 2/3 of CBtD. I don't know if I had ever seen the film before, but I remember reading the book in either grade school or middle school. Though I had to look it up to realize that it was an autobiography (I always thought it was fictional).
    The film is a wonderfully droll family comedy that is well acted, moves along at a nice pace, and isn't the least bit treacly. There are quite a few poignant moments and more than a few laugh-out-loud elements, so it's also pretty well-balanced between comedy and drama.
    I hate to call it a "wholesome comedy," because of the misconnotations that the word "wholesome" may conjure up, but damn if that ain't the best way to describe it; it felt like one of those vintage Disney family films before the House of the Mouse got all cookie cutter with their stories and franchises.


    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

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  13. #88
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    MA AND PA KETTLE BACK ON THE FARM (1951)
    This slapstick endeavor came on after the aforementioned Cheaper By The Dozen. Initially, I was a bit bummed that TCM hadn't scheduled the sequel to the former, 1952's Bells On Their Toes. I was a tad flummoxed as to why they would follow up such a well crafted family comedy with such a MOTR cliche ridden slapstick film such as this, but then it hit me: TCM was showing films about families to celebrate Thanksgiving.
    At any rate, I had to look up The Kettles on the webz. This was the third of nine (!!!) films, proving that Hollywood has always taken the low road in terms of milking a successful project and turning it into a franchise.
    I attempted to leave and not finish watching the film at least a dozen times, but I kept coming back. My pops, to his credit (he's 90) sat through the whole thing without getting up once.
    It's a pretty formulaic comedy: Ma and Pa Kettle are a couple of bumpkins with a passel of kids (looked like more than 12). Their oldest is married and his wife just had a baby. Naturally, the wife comes from a blueblood upstate family and the comedy that ensues plays the down home country folks against the cultured city folk. There's a uranium subplot and a bunch of white actors painted up as native Americans. The whole thing felt like an extended episode of The Beverly Hillbillies.
    There were a few decent comedic bits, but overall it felt very familiar, borrowing schtick from Laurel and Hardy, Charlie Chaplin, and Buster Keaton, just to name a few.
    There is no way I feel compelled to track down the other eight entries in the franchise (though the irony of me having watched all 11 entries in the Fast and the Furious franchise isn't lost on me).
    If nothing else, this film shows how little Hollywood has changed over the years in regards to franchising an idea.

    Last edited by dookeyXXX; 11-27-2023 at 10:48 AM.
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

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  14. #89
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    I had completely forgotten about the Ma & Pa Kettle franchise. Wow that’s the way back machine to the days of prolific movie rerun shows. Next up Bowery Boys?

  15. #90
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    LAURA

    LAURA - 1944


    Just had another watch of "Laura," the 1944 gem directed by Otto Preminger. It's a fascinating fusion of mystery, romance, and film noir. Gene Tierney is absolutely spellbinding as Laura, and Dana Andrews delivers a robust performance as the detective who becomes enchanted with the subject of his murder investigation. The film's ambience is captivatingly eerie, complemented brilliantly by David Raksin's score.
    This film has a special resonance for me; I had the task of writing an essay on it during my film studies course. I found some invaluable insights and critical viewpoints at https://essays.io, which really helped me to explore the film’s intricate themes and its exploration of obsession. For anyone who values the intricate dance of romance and mystery in classic cinema, "Laura" is a must-see. It’s a sterling example of the genre and a testament to the era's filmmaking prowess.
    Last edited by HillaryDove; 11-27-2023 at 12:34 PM.

  16. #91
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    Smile Double Indemnity'

    another classic from the 1940s. Directed by Billy Wilder, this film is a quintessential example of film noir, filled with suspense, sharp dialogue, and plot twists. The chemistry between Fred MacMurray and Barbara Stanwyck is electric, and their performances are top-notch. Edward G. Robinson also adds a stellar supporting role. The movie's cleverly crafted narrative and Wilder's innovative direction make it a must-watch for fans of classic cinema. It's a masterclass in tension and storytelling, perfect for those who love the intrigue and style of the noir genre.

  17. #92
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    Smile Casablanca

    'Casablanca' is an absolute must-watch. Directed by Michael Curtiz in 1942, this film is not just a movie, it's a piece of cinematic history. The story, set against the backdrop of World War II, combines elements of romance, drama, and political intrigue. Humphrey Bogart's portrayal of Rick Blaine is iconic, and Ingrid Bergman as Ilsa Lund brings a captivating mix of vulnerability and strength. The chemistry between them is unforgettable. The film's dialogue is sharp and memorable, especially lines like 'Here's looking at you, kid.' The blend of emotional depth, complex characters, and historical context makes 'Casablanca' a timeless masterpiece that resonates even today.

  18. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillaryDove View Post
    another classic from the 1940s. Directed by Billy Wilder, this film is a quintessential example of film noir, filled with suspense, sharp dialogue, and plot twists. The chemistry between Fred MacMurray and Barbara Stanwyck is electric, and their performances are top-notch. Edward G. Robinson also adds a stellar supporting role. The movie's cleverly crafted narrative and Wilder's innovative direction make it a must-watch for fans of classic cinema. It's a masterclass in tension and storytelling, perfect for those who love the intrigue and style of the noir genre.
    Are you talking about “Double Indemnity” and are you a bot?


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  19. #94
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    To Kill a Mockingbird

    If you're delving into the classics, 'To Kill a Mockingbird' from 1962 is a profound choice. Directed by Robert Mulligan, this film adaptation of Harper Lee's novel is a powerful exploration of racial injustice and moral integrity in the Deep South. Gregory Peck's portrayal of Atticus Finch is legendary, earning him an Academy Award for Best Actor. His performance embodies the principled, compassionate lawyer fighting against ingrained prejudices.

  20. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentUnicorn View Post
    Are you talking about “Double Indemnity” and are you a bot?


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    haha, why?) just a newbie sharing movies

  21. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentUnicorn View Post
    Are you talking about “Double Indemnity” and are you a bot?


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums



    Yeah, those “reviews” read like autobotted Cliff’s Notes.
    They show up on my screen in black text, which usually means that they were cut and pasted from another site...

    I have always felt that one should have at least 100 skiing/riding related posts before being allowed to post in MBM or PR (same as you have to have a minimum amount of posts to sell gear).
    I know that’s being exclusionary, but I prefer to talk movies (and music and books) with folks whom I know also schuss.
    If I wanted to discuss film, music, and books with nerds of those particular entertainments who didn't also ski/ride, then I'd be on another forum.

    I mean this is a skiing/action sports forum after all…
    Last edited by dookeyXXX; 11-28-2023 at 11:18 AM.
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

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  22. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillaryDove View Post
    haha, why?) just a newbie sharing movies
    A gentle bit of counsel. When someone with no posting history and a join date of < 30 days starts spamming a bunch of shit to up their post count I usually put them on ignore.
    I have been in this State for 30 years and I am willing to admit that I am part of the problem.

    "Happiest years of my life were earning < $8.00 and hour, collecting unemployment every spring and fall, no car, no debt and no responsibilities. 1984-1990 Park City UT"

  23. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillaryDove View Post
    haha, why?) just a newbie sharing movies
    You didn’t post the title of the movie but that’s the one it sounds like given the cast you posted


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  24. #99
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    THE THREE MUSKETEERS (1921)
    Streaming on Kanopy.

    Busted my Douglas Fairbanks cherry tonight with this silent gem.
    Man, that dude was one lithe, acrobatic mofo.
    While I am still partial to Richard Lester’s bawdy 1970’s Musketeer flicks, this is a strong second for best of all the versions I have seen over the years.
    Great pacing, fantastic cinematography, cool sets, and Fairbanks grinning while he skewers baddies with his rapier.
    Highly recommended.
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

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