Check Out Our Shop
Page 7 of 41 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ... LastLast
Results 151 to 175 of 1018

Thread: Tool Time

  1. #151
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    6,783
    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    Is it bad that I think the most impressive part of Gunder's shop is how clean it is?
    Possibly. It's also possible that this thread should be titled OCD Time instead of tool time and many of us that post here, myself included, should look in the mirror.

  2. #152
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    5,826
    Quote Originally Posted by Gunder View Post
    Nice, those look pretty good. These are the 3 sets I own.
    Attachment 418963
    The Wolftooths live in my riding pack, and they double as tire levers. The Unior's in the middle are my go to these days. They are about 15mm longer than the Park ones and have lower profile nose. Plus they just feel better than the Park's. The Parks have been relegated to my travel bag. The tips are wide enough they dont fit as easily into a 12 speed chain as the Unior's and they are too stiff. Plus its nice having the spring feature on these types of pliers IMOP.
    Aha! But my new one is to close the link, not open it.

    Is it possible that I now have a tool that you don’t already have multiples of? Also, my Park one technically opens and closes the link, so I have multiple closing tools! (Though the Park one actually sucks for closing the link, which is why I picked up this KMC closer.)

  3. #153
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Mt. Baker
    Posts
    1,756
    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    Is it bad that I think the most impressive part of Gunder's shop is how clean it is?
    I normally keep it quite clean and organized, so its easy to find stuff and efficient... however it's a full on shit show at the moment, with the lathe completely torn apart. I just dont have enough space for projects that big so most the work benches are now covered in lathe parts.

    Quote Originally Posted by EWG View Post
    Possibly. It's also possible that this thread should be titled OCD Time instead of tool time and many of us that post here, myself included, should look in the mirror.
    I'd prefer CDO as thats alphabetical.

    Quote Originally Posted by J. Barron DeJong View Post
    Aha! But my new one is to close the link, not open it.

    Is it possible that I now have a tool that you don’t already have multiples of? Also, my Park one technically opens and closes the link, so I have multiple closing tools! (Though the Park one actually sucks for closing the link, which is why I picked up this KMC closer.)
    You got me there While I may own lots of tools, all of them are ones that either perform a specific task, or enable me to do a job more effectively / efficiently. I just dont see the need for pliers to close the link. I have always just put the links together, grabbed the brake with one hand and pushed the cranks forward. It instantly locks the link in and takes less time than it would be to grab a pair of pliers and fumble with inserting them into the link section.
    Last edited by Gunder; 06-15-2022 at 10:38 PM.

  4. #154
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    5,826
    Quote Originally Posted by Gunder View Post
    You got me there While I may own lots of tools, all of them are ones that either prefer a specific task, or enable me to do a job more effectively / efficiently. I just dont see the need for pliers to close the link. I have always just put the links together, grabbed the brake with one hand and pushed the cranks forward. It instantly locks the link in and takes less time than it would be to grab a pair of pliers and fumble with inserting them into the link section.
    Yeah, I’ve always managed fine in the past, but since starting the Queso dip routine I’m messing with links more often, and whether it’s the Queso or the links, they seem more difficult to close recently, so decided to splurge.

  5. #155
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Mt. Baker
    Posts
    1,756
    Quote Originally Posted by J. Barron DeJong View Post
    Yeah, I’ve always managed fine in the past, but since starting the Queso dip routine I’m messing with links more often, and whether it’s the Queso or the links, they seem more difficult to close recently, so decided to splurge.
    I bet its the wax build up. Wend sent me some of their chain wax a few years ago to try, and found that it was pretty worthless here in the PNW it just gunked up and didnt last. I'm a really big fan of just using Boeshield T9 and buy it by the gallon.
    Last edited by Gunder; 06-15-2022 at 10:37 PM.

  6. #156
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Can/USA
    Posts
    1,689
    Gunder…. That is very impressive. The neatness, organization and cleanliness is so amazing. The sheer amount of tools and knowledge you have is incredible!!!! Well done


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  7. #157
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Mt. Baker
    Posts
    1,756
    Quote Originally Posted by Sandbox View Post
    Gunder…. That is very impressive. The neatness, organization and cleanliness is so amazing. The sheer amount of tools and knowledge you have is incredible!!!! Well done
    Thanks!

  8. #158
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    5,826
    Quote Originally Posted by Gunder View Post
    I bet its the wax build up. Wend sent me some of their chain wax a few years ago to try, and found that it was pretty worthless here in the PNW it just gunked up and didnt last. I'm a really big fan of just using Boeshield T9 and buy it by the gallon.
    Don’t want to derail this thread, but Wend Wax is apparently a pretty crappy product, so not shocking that you’d be disappointed:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	288A66F0-CDC9-4AED-920F-2A27391CFEE8.png 
Views:	91 
Size:	762.1 KB 
ID:	419009

    High quality Queso should be a cleaner and more slippery version of T-9, and I’d think it would have better longevity since it’s all lube no filler. Zero Friction has talked about testing T-9 when they have open time on a test rig, and I’m interested in seeing those results.

  9. #159
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Mt. Baker
    Posts
    1,756
    Quote Originally Posted by J. Barron DeJong View Post
    Don’t want to derail this thread, but Wend Wax is apparently a pretty crappy product, so not shocking that you’d be disappointed:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	288A66F0-CDC9-4AED-920F-2A27391CFEE8.png 
Views:	91 
Size:	762.1 KB 
ID:	419009

    High quality Queso should be a cleaner and more slippery version of T-9, and I’d think it would have better longevity since it’s all lube no filler. Zero Friction has talked about testing T-9 when they have open time on a test rig, and I’m interested in seeing those results.
    Wend is a pretty major OEM supplier for most of "wax and lube" companies in skiing, surfing and biking. At the end of the day, I'm not a fan of their products performance whether it's something they brand or that someone else does.

    The vast majority of all chain wear is not due to a lack of lubrication, but instead is from contamination. So the best way to increase chain life, like most mechanical things is to keep it clean. I use an ultrasonic cleaner ( use water and dawn in it, Simple Green will strip the anodizing on aluminum parts) to clean my drive train once a month or so (more often this year). My experience with traditional wax lubes is its more difficult to clean off, and more difficult to apply. I would much rather have a cleaner chain that is cleaned and lubed more often to reduce contamination, so thus I like wet lubes.

    Wet lubes are also thiner, (even when wax is melted) so they do a better job of penetrating into the relative tight tolerances that make up the chain rollers. (I think you are noticing this with your quick links being more difficult to latch due to wax and containment build up). This same argument works for wet lubes over dry lubes in general. Liquids in general do a better job of penetration than solids. Just think about the difference between ice and water and which one will soak through a garment.

    Most bike lube mfg's are just rebranding and relabeling industrial lubricants. A few things to note, I dont like WD40 for a lube. It is actually a Water Displacement formula and not a lubricant. It was designed to be a corrosion inhibitor and not a lubricant. Its used quite often as an industrial cleaner, but more relative to biking, it is commonly used as a CUTTING FLUID for aluminum.

    Boeshield T9, was developed by Boeing and I am willing to bet they have done a hell of a lot more testing on what's the best lubricant for aluminum and other metals than any bike lube or website has done. It uses a solvent carrier, so It's thin, enabling it to seep into tight areas, the solvent helps flush gunk out, than evaporates and it dries into a film and doesn't seem to collect as much dirt and grime (contamination) as other lubes (wet or dry), it is easy to clean off and reapply. Since it uses a solvent carrier, each time you reapply it, you are essentially flushing the old stuff out, resulting in a cleaner chain. It is also very commonly used in industry for lubricating industrial machine parts.

  10. #160
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    6,783
    Ok all, since we are on the topic, what is Prolink Gold a rebrand of? I'd love to just buy it buy the gallon from the source...

  11. #161
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    The Fish
    Posts
    4,776
    T-9 is great stuff for the right application but it is dry lube not a wet lube and does have wax in it.

    Bike chain lube is funny, I like Dumonde Tech Light personally… but it does stink. In the end I use what ever wet lube is around and keep it clean like Gunner said.
    a positive attitude will not solve all of your problems, but it may annoy enough people to make it worth the effort

    Formerly Rludes025

  12. #162
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    5,826
    Quote Originally Posted by Gunder View Post
    Wend is a pretty major OEM supplier for most of "wax and lube" companies in skiing, surfing and biking. At the end of the day, I'm not a fan of their products performance whether it's something they brand or that someone else does.

    The vast majority of all chain wear is not due to a lack of lubrication, but instead is from contamination. So the best way to increase chain life, like most mechanical things is to keep it clean. I use an ultrasonic cleaner ( use water and dawn in it, Simple Green will strip the anodizing on aluminum parts) to clean my drive train once a month or so (more often this year). My experience with traditional wax lubes is its more difficult to clean off, and more difficult to apply. I would much rather have a cleaner chain that is cleaned and lubed more often to reduce contamination, so thus I like wet lubes.

    Wet lubes are also thiner, (even when wax is melted) so they do a better job of penetrating into the relative tight tolerances that make up the chain rollers. (I think you are noticing this with your quick links being more difficult to latch due to wax and containment build up). This same argument works for wet lubes over dry lubes in general. Liquids in general do a better job of penetration than solids. Just think about the difference between ice and water and which one will soak through a garment.

    Most bike lube mfg's are just rebranding and relabeling industrial lubricants. A few things to note, I dont like WD40 for a lube. It is actually a Water Displacement formula and not a lubricant. It was designed to be a corrosion inhibitor and not a lubricant. Its used quite often as an industrial cleaner, but more relative to biking, it is commonly used as a CUTTING FLUID for aluminum.

    Boeshield T9, was developed by Boeing and I am willing to bet they have done a hell of a lot more testing on what's the best lubricant for aluminum and other metals than any bike lube or website has done. It uses a solvent carrier, so It's thin, enabling it to seep into tight areas, the solvent helps flush gunk out, than evaporates and it dries into a film and doesn't seem to collect as much dirt and grime (contamination) as other lubes (wet or dry), it is easy to clean off and reapply. Since it uses a solvent carrier, each time you reapply it, you are essentially flushing the old stuff out, resulting in a cleaner chain. It is also very commonly used in industry for lubricating industrial machine parts.
    This is the derailment I was trying to avoid .

    - Queso doesn’t seem to have any penetration issues. (At least the commercial formulas anyway.)

    - Molten Speed Wax and Silca Super Secret can be cleaned off very effectively by just swishing the chains around in a couple changes of boiled water.

    - Queso is very good with contamination since it’s 1) dry and not tacky so it doesn’t attract/hold dust and dirt, and 2) sheds wax particles constantly, carrying out the contamination with them.

    I’d have said wet weather might change the calculus a little, but if you’re doing ultrasonic cleaning and everything, not sure how much more effort the queso route would actually be.

    Like I said earlier though, I am interested to see how T-9 tests. We stocked it in the shop I worked at back in the day and none of us were fans of it, but we were also all using Pedro’s Syn Lube, which likely sucked much worse than T-9 knowing what I know now.

  13. #163
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Tahoe-ish
    Posts
    3,191
    Quote Originally Posted by J. Barron DeJong View Post
    This is the derailment I was trying to avoid .

    - .
    No thread is safe from a chain lube derailment.

    Here's a serious question for Gunder and others. How do you maintain such surgery-suite cleanliness in your shop? I can understand if you're only doing machining or bike stuff, but woodworking and metal grinding dust seems to get absolutely everywhere. I know that there are better dust collection and control solutions out there, but I have a pretty good setup (dust collector for stationary tools, Bosch Airsweep Hepa vac for the sanders and track saw, overhead extraction blower, etc), and there is always SOME dust, even if it's just a little from hand sanding. Yesterday I spent about 6 hours in the shop building some custom floating shelves. You know, plane the rough lumber, glue-up, rip miters, glue the boxes, sanding, etc. Where does one find the time to then go around the shop with a tiny vacuum brush attachment to get every speck of dust?

    I see these shops on YouTube videos etc where they have open shelves of hand planes or whatever, and they are always spotless--not just no piles of sawdust, but no fine dust on the shelves or on the clamps or anywhere. What's the ratio of cleaning to building stuff? Do they actually build stuff?
    Last edited by climberevan; 06-16-2022 at 10:06 AM.
    ride bikes, climb, ski, travel, cook, work to fund former, repeat.

  14. #164
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    SLCizzy
    Posts
    3,580
    Quote Originally Posted by Gunder View Post
    A few things to note, I dont like WD40 for a lube. It is actually a Water Displacement formula and not a lubricant. It was designed to be a corrosion inhibitor and not a lubricant. Its used quite often as an industrial cleaner, but more relative to biking, it is commonly used as a CUTTING FLUID for aluminum.
    This is some real cutting edge information.
    Pun very intended.





    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  15. #165
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Mt. Baker
    Posts
    1,756
    Quote Originally Posted by EWG View Post
    Ok all, since we are on the topic, what is j a rebrand of? I'd love to just buy it buy the gallon from the source...



    I’d start by looking at a copy of the https://progoldmfr.com/wp-content/up...17/10/4026.pdf and seeing what is in it.


    For example it’s widely known that Slick Honey / SRAM Butter is just rebranded Slickoleum. I just buy the Slickoleum tubs. It’s way cheaper!

    Slickoleum

    Calcium 12 Hydroxy Stearate
    Mineral Oil

    Slick honey

    Distillates,
    Calcium 12- hydroxy Stearate




    Pro link gold


    Butane
    Aliphatic Hydrocarbons
    Hydrotreated Heavy Naphthenic Distillate
    Propane
    Alkanes, (C=6-18), chloro
    Solvent Naphtha (petroleum), light aromatic

    Here is Boesheild T9

    PETROLEUM DISTILLATE
    HYDROTREATED HEAVY PETROLEUM NAPHTHA PETROLEUM OIL
    PETROLATUM
    SORBITAN TRIOLEATE
    OIL SOLUBLE SODIUM SULFONATE

    Here is wd40

    LVP Aliphatic Hydrocarbon
    Petroleum Base Oil
    Aliphatic Hydrocarbon
    (Flammable Liquid Category 3 Aspiration Toxicity Category 1 Specific Target Organ Toxicity Single Exposure Category 3 (nervous system effects))
    Carbon Dioxide

    SiliKroil

    Severely Hydrotreated Petroleum Distillates LVP Aliphatic Hydrocarbon
    Proprietary Additive
    Diisobutyl Ketone
    Aliphatic Alcohol #1 Aliphatic Alcohol #2

    Kroil

    Severely Hydrotreated Petroleum Distillates LVP Aliphatic Hydrocarbon
    Proprietary Additive
    Diisobutyl Ketone
    Aliphatic Alcohol #1 Aliphatic Alcohol #2

  16. #166
    Join Date
    Mar 2022
    Posts
    919
    Ok, here's my tool that I bet nobody else has. Homemade, but I'd be surprised if anyone has the real one.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	tool.jpg 
Views:	77 
Size:	363.7 KB 
ID:	419048

    It notched tool for disassembling a Bendix Automatic 2-speed kickback hub (no shifter--shift by pedaling backwards).

    Looks like certain freewheel tools, but as far as I know, nothing Park makes fits (it is much smaller).

    Use it about once a year to repack the grease in my red-band hub when the braking starts to feel sticky...although I think its days may be numbered as it is getting pretty rusty and I've completely destroyed one of the brass discs in the brake stack.

  17. #167
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Mt. Baker
    Posts
    1,756
    Quote Originally Posted by singlesline View Post
    Ok, here's my tool that I bet nobody else has. Homemade, but I'd be surprised if anyone has the real one.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	tool.jpg 
Views:	77 
Size:	363.7 KB 
ID:	419048

    It notched tool for disassembling a Bendix Automatic 2-speed kickback hub (no shifter--shift by pedaling backwards).

    Looks like certain freewheel tools, but as far as I know, nothing Park makes fits (it is much smaller).
    .
    Custom spanner wrench. Nice.
    I used to use those a lot when I did a lot of camera repair work back in college.
    The adjustable set is really nice, its made in Germany, no idea by whom, but it has a bunch of different interchangeable tips from pins to blades. I dont use it every day, but its nice to have as it does a job nothing else will. The smaller ones where made by Pentax specifically for their 6x7 cameras, but they seem to fit a lot of battery doors that use pins.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_6218.jpg 
Views:	73 
Size:	883.2 KB 
ID:	419072
    This is a set of Park Tool pin spanners, I haven't used them in a while, but they used to be pretty commonly needed for rebuilding rear hubs.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_6219.jpg 
Views:	75 
Size:	876.9 KB 
ID:	419073
    These are various pin and notch spanners typically used for bearing retainers on industrial equipment, such as my Bridgeport mill and on the lathe I am rebuilding.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_6220.jpg 
Views:	67 
Size:	941.2 KB 
ID:	419075

    Having the Bridgeport is really nice as it allows me to build custom tools when needed.

    The monarch 10EE uses a lot of tappered pins to retain shafts and knobs. You can tap these out with a starter punch an a hammer, but you risk damaging the shafts / parts. So I took an C-clamp and machined it into a portable press for the pins.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0846.jpg 
Views:	67 
Size:	795.8 KB 
ID:	419076
    It worked really well!
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0852.jpg 
Views:	60 
Size:	593.7 KB 
ID:	419077
    The lathe also requires pin spanners to remove the hand wheels. I didnt want to risk damaging the parts with an adjustable pin spanner, so I took a piece of AL bar and pressed the appropriate size machine dowels into it. The green fluid is retaining compound that ensures the pins dont come loose.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0944.jpg 
Views:	66 
Size:	488.7 KB 
ID:	419079
    The cross drilled shaft allows me to insert a longer punch, to use as leverage.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0954.jpg 
Views:	64 
Size:	475.4 KB 
ID:	419080
    They worked really well!
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0947.jpg 
Views:	61 
Size:	552.5 KB 
ID:	419081

  18. #168
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Tahoe-ish
    Posts
    3,191
    Gunder with the FATALITY on singlesline's (excellent) custom wrench.

    The Clam Clamps I posted are very specialty pieces for on-site high end wood window & door casing miters, and I wouldn't expect even many trim carpenters to have them. I've had mine for a long time and have never met anyone else who has a set. I claim victory in the game, so far.
    ride bikes, climb, ski, travel, cook, work to fund former, repeat.

  19. #169
    Join Date
    Mar 2022
    Posts
    919
    Apparently someone on ebay has started machining and selling the Bendix tool

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Bendix-Coas...5.c20#viTabs_0

    At least I assume they are making them, especially since they don't say NOS. I find it unlikely that they somehow found hundreds of tools (without packaging) when people have been saying the tool is unobtanium for decades. But the seller has a bunch of other NOS bike stuff, so maybe they found a secret stash.

  20. #170
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    6,783
    Quote Originally Posted by climberevan View Post
    Gunder with the FATALITY on singlesline's (excellent) custom wrench.

    The Clam Clamps I posted are very specialty pieces for on-site high end wood window & door casing miters, and I wouldn't expect even many trim carpenters to have them. I've had mine for a long time and have never met anyone else who has a set. I claim victory in the game, so far.
    I'm not sure I'm giving you the win. You only get a win if Gunder doesn't have a tool that can complete on site frame mitering as well or better than your clam clamps. That's not yet been addressed.

  21. #171
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Mt. Baker
    Posts
    1,756
    Quote Originally Posted by EWG View Post
    I'm not sure I'm giving you the win. You only get a win if Gunder doesn't have a tool that can complete on site frame mitering as well or better than your clam clamps. That's not yet been addressed.
    The domino allows you to create a miter joint with a tennon, so no clamping is nescesary, and its a stronger joint, that wont separate like a standard miter.

    https://www.festoolusa.com/knowledge...ls/accessories

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...uQDvv7wgCtytFE

  22. #172
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Tahoe-ish
    Posts
    3,191
    I can appreciate the Domino's uselessness, but I've never seen or heard of them being used for casing. The issue isn't alignment--bisquits also take care of that--it's holding the miter super tight until the glue dries. How does it obviate the need for clamping?

    The Domino is arguably sometimes a superior tool to a bisquit joiner (especially if one likes to pay a lot for proprietary oblong dowels), but it's not a miter clamp, so I still claim victory, but welcome challenges!
    ride bikes, climb, ski, travel, cook, work to fund former, repeat.

  23. #173
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Your Mom's House
    Posts
    8,332
    Ooh we're to the point where both are telling the other that they're doing it wrong! Grabbing popcorn.

    Does the guy with the more expensive tools win or lose in event of a tie?
    Last edited by adrenalated; 06-16-2022 at 04:44 PM.

  24. #174
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    6,783
    Quote Originally Posted by adrenalated View Post
    Does the guy with the more expensive tools win or lose in event of a tie?

    Those of us watching win. Pass the popcorn.

  25. #175
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Carbondale
    Posts
    12,537
    Quote Originally Posted by EWG View Post
    I'm not sure I'm giving you the win. You only get a win if Gunder doesn't have a tool that can complete on site frame mitering as well or better than your clam clamps. That's not yet been addressed.
    Gunder has the tool to make that tool... so...
    www.dpsskis.com
    www.point6.com
    formerly an ambassador for a few others, but the ski industry is... interesting.
    Fukt: a very small amount of snow.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •