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  1. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Folsom, CA
    Posts
    536
    thanks
    A good friend would come bail you out of jail. A great friend would be sitting next to you saying..."but damn that was FUN"

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    25
    Last season the issue with my boots was that they hurt my feet and froze my toes when I was skiing. I got them punched at the beginning of last season. I also had to wear thin socks in order to get them on. Now I try them on, my left foot is a little bit bigger than my right foot, both toes of my feet curl down. I went to try on a few pairs of ski boots w/o knowing the size of my current pair of boots. The person who was fitting put 26.5 boots on both my feet, it felt really tight and I just went home to look at my boots. When I got home I checked my boots and the only size I could find said "270mm-275mm" (does this = 27/27.5?) and they are also too small for me and they've been punched. So should I buy new boots or just get my current ones punched again?
    Last edited by brendan26; 11-13-2008 at 08:53 PM.

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banff
    Posts
    18,753
    please re-read part #1 and answer the questions


    1) What is the shell fit like for length? Remove the liner, put your foot in the shell only, have your toes lightly touching the front of the boot and see how much room is behind your heel and the boots shell. Use a pen as a spacer and measure this for thickness. You want 5-15mm (1/8 to Ĺ inch) of room. If you have more then 25mm stop here

    2) What is the shell fit like for width? Now center your foot front to back, (same amount of room behind the toe and heel) and is the width of your foot touching the sides of the boots shell? You want anything from lightly brushing to 2mm per side. If you have 3mm per side stop here.

    3) Do you have any footebds? Most people find a off the rack, or full custom footbed more comfortable, and helps to hold the foot in place better, Get one.

    So if you boot is within all of the above parameters we can go on. If you boot is just too big it is not worth working on. Your foot will still move around, you have to over tighten the buckles, and cramp to foot and cut off circulation (cold toes). Your boots are too big, and nothing will make that much better. Donít waste your time, and money fixing a broken leg with bandaids. You need boots that are 1-2 sizes smaller. If you really want work on what you have, a boot fitter can do somethings, but it will not get much better, and will be $50 - $150 for not much progress.


    odds are your boots are OK in length (question 1) but too narrow in width (question 2)

    then check that you are doing things right in part 2

    then answer the questions in part #3

    Email me at dave@fatskideals.com for boot fitting questions,
    read where I'm skiing at http://www.fatskideals.com/blog.html

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    25
    1. behind heel: left - 7mm of space, right - 13mm of space
    2. sides: both right and left are more than slightly touching
    3. yes

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banff
    Posts
    18,753
    sounds like the right length, just too narrow


    A few basic things to check first:

    1) You just have one, thin, clean ski sock in the boots
    2) You just have a sock in the boot? (no thermals, jewelry, etc)
    3) Your toe nails are trimmed short?
    4) They are YOUR boots and not borrowed?
    5) You are just skiing in your ski boots? (not walking, driving etc)?
    6) You dry your liners out at night either with a dryer or remove liners?
    7) The left liner, the left footbed are in the left boot and this is on the left foot?
    8) You are loosening the buckles if you are not skiing (while standing, on lifts, etc)
    9) You are not skiing all day in new boots? They need time to break in
    10) Buckles are pointing to the outside?

    what are they like for with if you keep the toe buckles OFF, (not just loose)

    Email me at dave@fatskideals.com for boot fitting questions,
    read where I'm skiing at http://www.fatskideals.com/blog.html

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by mntlion View Post
    sounds like the right length, just too narrow


    A few basic things to check first:

    1) You just have one, thin, clean ski sock in the boots
    2) You just have a sock in the boot? (no thermals, jewelry, etc)
    3) Your toe nails are trimmed short?
    4) They are YOUR boots and not borrowed?
    5) You are just skiing in your ski boots? (not walking, driving etc)?
    6) You dry your liners out at night either with a dryer or remove liners?
    7) The left liner, the left footbed are in the left boot and this is on the left foot?
    8) You are loosening the buckles if you are not skiing (while standing, on lifts, etc)
    9) You are not skiing all day in new boots? They need time to break in
    10) Buckles are pointing to the outside?

    what are they like for with if you keep the toe buckles OFF, (not just loose)
    what do you mean by the bold red?

    I'm using a thin ski sock. I usually loosened them when I wasn't skiing (it just hurt too much).

  7. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banff
    Posts
    18,753
    that is a question as well?

    what are they like for with if you keep the toe buckles OFF, (not just loose)?

    Email me at dave@fatskideals.com for boot fitting questions,
    read where I'm skiing at http://www.fatskideals.com/blog.html

  8. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by mntlion View Post
    that is a question as well?

    what are they like for with if you keep the toe buckles OFF, (not just loose)?
    with just the shell or the liner, with the shell i can feel the sides more than slightly.

  9. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banff
    Posts
    18,753
    so the ski boots are better to ski in with the buckles off then?

    that and a bit more of a width punch and I bet you will be OK

    Email me at dave@fatskideals.com for boot fitting questions,
    read where I'm skiing at http://www.fatskideals.com/blog.html

  10. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banff
    Posts
    18,753
    bump for boot fitting question again

    dave@fitcentre.ca is direct to me.

    Email me at dave@fatskideals.com for boot fitting questions,
    read where I'm skiing at http://www.fatskideals.com/blog.html

  11. #36
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    561
    1) What is the shell fit like for length?

    about 1/2 an inch, i've been told length is perfect by multiple people

    2) What is the shell fit like for width? Now center your foot front to back, (same amount of room behind the toe and heel) and is the width of your foot touching the sides of the boots shell?

    Touching a bit on the forefoot.

    3) Do you have any footebds? Most people find a off the rack, or full custom footbed more comfortable, and helps to hold the foot in place better, Get one.

    Got custom moulded footbeds


    So now that your boot is within a workable size range in length, width and with a supportive footbed we can go on to getting more info.

    Ok, so i recently bought some Nordica Supercharger Enforcers in a 27 shell. I also looked at speedmachines and head S11's but the guy recommended these as they had a more performance fit. I've skied about 3/4 days in them and they kill me. They feel good when i put them on, nice and snug custom footbeds ect really happy when i walked around in the shop. However, when i ski something somewhat techincal and more demanding and fast my feet cramp up, its like its not wide enough in the forefoot (maybe?).What goes from a slight pressure is suddenly a sharp pain across my entire foot.

    My foot has a narrow heel, high instep, and wide forefoot/toe box.


    I've had one punch and it still does it, although not as bad. Did i get sold the wrong boot? The guy said he'd rather get a narrower boot and punch it rather than a wider throughout. I'm not sure if he has any idea what hes talking about or just trying to sell a boot. Should i find new bootfitter?

  12. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banff
    Posts
    18,753
    sounds like they are doable.
    are the boot Better Or Worse with .....

    1) BOW with the buckles tighter or looser?

    2) BOW with thinner or thicker socks?

    3) BOW with any footbeds (custom, stock, none, etc)?

    4) BOW skiing, standing, or feet un-weighted (hanging off a chair lift)?

    5) BOW thru out the day (and when does the pain start?)

    6) BOW on the first vs the third day?

    7) BOW on harder or easier terrain?

    8) BOW with the power straps (velcro straps) tighter or looser?

    9) BOW if you do any particular movements, or actions?

    10) Any medical, health, or weight changes since you used them last?

    Email me at dave@fatskideals.com for boot fitting questions,
    read where I'm skiing at http://www.fatskideals.com/blog.html

  13. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    561
    1) BOW with the buckles tighter or looser? Looser fingertight is the best

    2) BOW with thinner or thicker socks? B with thinner

    3) BOW with any footbeds (custom, stock, none, etc)? B with custom

    4) BOW skiing, standing, or feet un-weighted (hanging off a chair lift)? B with Hanging off chair

    5) BOW thru out the day (and when does the pain start?) Pain starts when i ski harder terrain and moguls

    6) BOW on the first vs the third day? same

    7) BOW on harder or easier terrain? W or harder terrain

    8) BOW with the power straps (velcro straps) tighter or looser? No difference noticeable in pain areas

    9) BOW if you do any particular movements, or actions? not sure what this is asking

    10) Any medical, health, or weight changes since you used them last? No'm

    I think it might just be too narrow in forefoot, fits perfectly everywhere else, but they guy seemed to think it was better to go narrow and punch that get a wider boot throughout

    Thanks a ton mntlion!

  14. #39
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banff
    Posts
    18,753
    try skiing with the toe buckles OFF (not just loose, but open 100%, not done up)

    also try without any footbed at all , and with a flat, non-supported footbed.

    this should tell us if the problem is the footbeds (because it is better unwieghted) , or the boot width (you are lightly touching the sides)

    I'm also thinking that it might be that you need more instep height too.

    Email me at dave@fatskideals.com for boot fitting questions,
    read where I'm skiing at http://www.fatskideals.com/blog.html

  15. #40
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Raleigh
    Posts
    3,840
    mntlion,
    My local shop always says that cooking boots (brand new or following seasons) is a waste of time because they'll pack out to feet after a day or two of skiing and pack out more appropriately for skiing. But when I've still got hot spots, it seems really tempting to cook 'em and I can't help wondering if I should have cooked 'em on day one. They're mid level Technicas FWIW, but they pretty much say this to everyone. What gives?

  16. #41
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banff
    Posts
    18,753
    I agree with the store, but it is not a negative to heat them, it just doesn;t do that much good. If you heated the left boot, and not the right, after a few days they will both feel the same.
    If you have used a boot more then 10 days it will nto make any difference, but agian will not hurt them, just not do much good.

    Email me at dave@fatskideals.com for boot fitting questions,
    read where I'm skiing at http://www.fatskideals.com/blog.html

  17. #42
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Jackson
    Posts
    893
    I don't mean to step on Mtnlion's toes but I think DHogg is leaning back in more challenging terrain, putting pressure on his instep and calf and cutting off the circulation to his foot.

    You could blow out the boot but a better answer might be to work on staying forward. Does the pain/pressure goes away when you stop skiing and flex the boot forward?

  18. #43
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Truckee, CA
    Posts
    4,530
    ^i was having this problem: leaning backseat on challenging terrain, front of foot falling asleep, toes tensed up and crunched.

    turned out, unbeknownst to me, i had about 1/2-1 inch of heel lifts (somebody had stuck heel lifts on my Superfeet beds and then i'd had additional lifts put into the boots themselves). latest bootfitter i went to surmised that some of my BS problem stemmed from me over-compensating for all the lift that was shoving my toes into the front of my boots. he stripped out all of the lifts, tossed out the Superfeet and re-balanced me. haven't tried 'em out yet, but will letcha know how they work.

    the other thing he did, which no other bootfitter i've been to has done, was to measure the circumference of my foot (the area from your heel over the top of your foot where it flexes). apparently that area can be longer than the length of your foot and if it is, going into a size or 2 smaller boot could be a problem and lead to the numb forefoot. we also discovered that my boots were pinching some nerve back by the inside of the heel, which was also causing me feet to go to sleep.

    as Mntlion has suggested, go find a solid bootfitter and work with them (give them all the info on how you ski, what equipment you ski, where you ski, how often, and especially what's going on with your feet and the boots; where hotspots are, what part, if any, is falling asleep, etc).
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

  19. #44
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    not close enough
    Posts
    2,506
    boot liner stretch? I just got my new boots for the season, which i bought online and sorta guessed on size. A friend of mine had a pair that were one full size larger, which he has skied for a season and were well packed out. I had plenty of room around the foot, and in the toes, so assumed I could get away with the size i bought. I got the boot and my toes touch the end of the liner. I guess it might be helpful to add that it is the Diabello Moro IDs with a therma fit liner. They aren't exactly uncomfortable standing in them, but i'm wondering if they might be too small when skied in, or if i should expect them to stretch a little. I've skied boots that were too small before and nearly broken my big toes, so i would like to know if I should return or if I should expect these to break in to a good fit.

  20. #45
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banff
    Posts
    18,753
    what is the shell fit like?
    toes: use a good footbed, thinner socks, and do your toes touch when you are standing or flexed.

    Odds are you will be fine, but if you bought them inperson, form a boot fitter, they could have helped with this answer in person.

    Email me at dave@fatskideals.com for boot fitting questions,
    read where I'm skiing at http://www.fatskideals.com/blog.html

  21. #46
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Denver, kinda
    Posts
    127
    Brilliant. Wish I had a printout of this last year.

  22. #47
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    not close enough
    Posts
    2,506
    Should the width of my Superfeet custom footbeds be the same width as my stock insoles? Mine are wider... a bit wider.

  23. #48
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banff
    Posts
    18,753
    the footbeds should be as wide as your foot. Assuming that your boots shell is a bit wider then your foot.

    Email me at dave@fatskideals.com for boot fitting questions,
    read where I'm skiing at http://www.fatskideals.com/blog.html

  24. #49
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Vancouver BC
    Posts
    2,424
    Hey mntlion, what's your opinion of Surefoot? Specifically the Whistler one. I've read people who swear by it and others who say it's a waste of money. I'm assuming a good bootfitter can do as good a job with a stock shell/liner (that fits one's foot). Moving to Vancouver next year and trying to decide which route to go.

  25. #50
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banff
    Posts
    18,753
    the person is more important then the store. overall, on average, sure foot is a good bet. The fit guarantee, and multi location is nice too. If you get the wrong kid, the guarantee will back you up for that.

    HOWEVER.....

    I bet that you can find a person, at some of the whistler store, that is better than surefoot, and I would go that route.

    search whistler, or bootfitters and see what comes up.

    PM Gonads, or Leelau, and see what they have to say.

    Email me at dave@fatskideals.com for boot fitting questions,
    read where I'm skiing at http://www.fatskideals.com/blog.html

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