Sign In:

×

Last Step!

Please enter your public display name and a secure password.

Plan to post in the forums? Change your default forum handle here!

×
×

Dynafit’s Hoji Boot Just Got A Whole Lot Better

Toewelttoewelttoewelttoewelttoewelttoewelt. Did you notice the toe welt? Dynafit listened to the feedback from the ski community to make one of the best ski touring boots even better. Dynafit photo.

Remember last year, when Dynafit announced a revolutionary new ski touring boot designed by the ski boot mastermind Eric “Hoji” Hjorleifson himself? Well, that original production boot was a phenomenal start, but left something to be desired for the hardcore freeriders out there. Dynafit listened to us skiers and made a few changes. So there’s a new version coming out, but what’s been updated? Two words: Toe welt.

RELATED: Safety Week - Introduction to Snow

The original Hoji Pro Tour will remain as a powerful ski touring boot designed to crush long approaches and huge lines, but it now has big brother: the 130-flex Hoji Free. The new boot features the same super-simple walk mode mechanism, but now has a stiffer liner and is compatible with DIN ISO 9523 (read: it works with most alpine bindings, the Shift, the Kingpin, the Tecton, and automatic crampons).

Ever the tinkerer, after he helped Dynafit release the original Hoji boot last season, Hjorleifson felt he needed to keep refining the design to suit his hard-charging style of skiing. So of course, he went straight back to the workshop with Dynafit's Fritz Barthel to perfect the boot. 

Hoji and Barthel geeking out over some early versions of the boot. Dynafit photo.

The boot still retains a comfortable 102mm last, a 55-degree range of motion in walk mode, and a svelte claimed weight of 1550 grams. Sidas provides a brand-new heat moldable liner designed to offer extra stiffness for charging downhill and comfort for long walks in the mountains.

Dynafit plans to release the Hoji Free starting next winter at $899. Stay tuned for more details on the boot from TGR. 

Hoji skis hard. Will you? Dynafit photo.

These are so awesome, they have such safety measures installed, great for mountain hiking.
See: Router Login

Play
READ THE STORY
Playgrounds: How To Ski Smart On Rogers Pass
Up Next Ski

Playgrounds: How To Ski Smart On Rogers Pass

Playgrounds: How To Ski Smart On Rogers Pass

A view of Mt. Cheops from Bonne trees. Travis Rousseau photo. Canada is vast and in the winter it can be cold and snowy - which is why so many people love it here. But as big as the country is, there just aren’t many roads. If you want to travel from one part of the country to another, you are going to have the take the Trans Canada Highway (TCH) aka Highway 1 which is the 7,821-km-long artery of Canada connecting East and West. RELATED: Estes Park - Colorado's Best Backcountry Skiing

Play
READ THE STORY
National Geographic Announces 2019 Adventurers of the Year
Up Next Adventure

National Geographic Announces 2019 Adventurers of the Year

National Geographic Announces 2019 Adventurers of the Year

2019 was a wild year in the adventure world, with everything from first descents and ascents of the planet’s wildest peaks, to stories of incredible rescue missions in impossibly harsh environments. Each year, National Geographic selects of Adventurers of the Year, people who have accomplished things so out of the ordinary that they deserve higher recognition. Among those who have won this award in the past are Jeremy Jones, Alex Honnold, Kilian Jornet, and Hilaree Nelson, to name a few.

Play
READ THE STORY
Video: Ski Base Has Returned to Jackson’s Cody Peak
Up Next Ski

Video: Ski Base Has Returned to Jackson’s Cody Peak

Video: Ski Base Has Returned to Jackson’s Cody Peak

It’s been a bit since we’ve seen anyone channel their inner Erik Roner and point it straight off one of the biggest and proudest cliffs in Jackson – the massive air looker’s left of Cody Peak’s Central Couloir. With all-time snow coverage and a healthy dose of blue sky, @tmeador_ski hucked it off Cody this weekend, pulling his chute above a small crowd of gaping onlookers. RELATED: Julian Carr Explains his Cliff Hucking Process That wasn’t the only hairball