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TGR Presents A New Snowboard Film: Roadless

The Teton Wilderness is one of the largest tracts of protected land in the lower 48. Home to stunning mountain scenery, massive amounts of snow and the home of the Yellowstone Grizzly, the hand of man has left this treasure trove largely untouched. In the winter of 2019, Bryan Iguchi teamed up with fellow snowboarders Jeremy Jones and Travis Rice to explore this untamed area on a 10-day human powered expedition, climbing and riding dozens of never-seen-before lines. In addition to our annual ski and snowboard production, follow this new mission in TGR’s latest snowboard film Roadless, dropping Fall 2019. 

RELATED: Explore the TGR Tough Fun Adventures

Filled with gratitude after a week touring through some of the most remote wilderness in the lower 48, pursuing the essence of a theme Bryan Iguchi has been committed to for decades. Guch, being able to join you and Jeremy Jones was a true honor, and what a fun trip packed with so much amazing riding!

-Travis Rice, snowboarder

Roadless began with a conversation over dinner a few years ago, we were talking about the remote alpine plateaus and eroded cirques of the Teton Wilderness, and got excited about the idea of traveling through this vast space, to experience the vacant land, and see a new perspective from the distant views.

-Bryan Iguchi, snowboarder

High above camp, Bryan Iguchi drops into yet another first descent. Ming T. Poon photo.

When Guch and I started talking about it, I was blown away that a place existed so remote and so big basically in our backyard that we knew very little about. The element of discovery was the ultimate draw, and the fact that the stars aligned for Travis and Jeremy to be a part of the adventure was priceless. The shared history of these legends of the sport added a layer we couldn't have anticipated.

-Jon Klaczkiewicz, producer

This is one of the wildest missions we’ve ever embarked on, with three of the most iconic snowboarders in the world. The terrain is mind-boggling and the candid insights of these athletes are truly unique.

-Steve Jones, producer and TGR co-founder

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Travis Rice Nearly Gets Taken Out By Avalanche in Chile
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Travis Rice Nearly Gets Taken Out By Avalanche in Chile

Travis Rice Nearly Gets Taken Out By Avalanche in Chile

For most people, longer, warmer days are a sign that it's time to put away the skis and puffy jackets and break out the swim trunks. Travis Rice isn't most people. Instead of meekly bowing to the seasons, he decided to pack up his snowboarding gear and head to the Southern Hemisphere. Specifically, he's been boarding in the Chilean Andes, presumably filming a big-mountain snowboarding segment. RELATED: Surfer Ian Walsh Shreds Alaska's Highest Peak In the above

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Jeremy Jones, Sage and Tommy Moe on the Importance of Family Skiing for Father’s Day
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Jeremy Jones, Sage and Tommy Moe on the Importance of Family Skiing for Father’s Day

Jeremy Jones, Sage and Tommy Moe on the Importance of Family Skiing for Father’s Day

There might be no greater joy in life than skiing/snowboarding with your family and passing on the love of riding to a new generation. And, chances are pretty high if you enjoy sliding down frozen water, your old man is the one who taught you how to do that. So call your dad today and tell him thanks: Without him, none of this would be possible.

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Step Inside the World’s Most Advanced Avalanche Research Lab
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Step Inside the World’s Most Advanced Avalanche Research Lab

Step Inside the World’s Most Advanced Avalanche Research Lab

Switzerland is one of the deadliest places on the planet when it comes to avalanches. Many of the country’s villages and roads lie beneath massive slide paths, and when it snows, big white walls of snow start moving. These days, those dangers are elevated thanks to a warming climate, and the team of scientists and avalanche forecasters at the WSL institute for Snow and Avalanche Research are figuring out how and why it affects mountain communities. RELATED: Colorado's Snowpack is 539% of