Sign In:

×

Last Step!

Please enter your public display name and a secure password.

Plan to post in the forums? Change your default forum handle here!

×
×

Jeremy Jones Takes A Test Run At 19,000 Feet - Higher Unplugged Episode 9

Last fall, Jones traveled to Nepal for the largest descent of his life—a 21,400 foot peak that he dubbed the Shangri-La Spine Wall. His arrival at the foot of this peak coincided with the final weeks of Nepal’s monsoon season. While waiting for a suitable weather window in which to summit his objective, Jones had ample opportunities to acclimate and plan for his mission.

Once the monsoon season began to subside, Jones still had to approach his objective with an element of patience. Before he could attempt to summit the Shangri-La Spine Wall, he first needed to simply get back on the snow. Between trekking to his base camp and waiting out the remainder of the monsoon season, three weeks had passed since he had arrived in Nepal. Yet in addition to his need to get back on the snow, Jones also needed to assess the safety and stability of the snowpack—especially since little information was available on the area’s conditions both before and throughout his trip to Nepal.

During their first day on the snow, Jones and Luca Pandolfi—his partner for the mission—summited a nearby peak for a test run. With the help of Nima Tasi Sherpa and Dawa Sherpa, the duo climbed Mingbo La Pass. Once a common route for climbers headed to Everest, this pass fell out of favor as easier routes opened up for accessing the peak’s base camp. With an aspect similar to that of the Shangri-La Spine Wall, Mingbo La Pass provided an opportunity to carefully study the area’s snowpack. At 19,000 feet, the pass also offered a glimpse into the challenges Jones and Pandolfi would face in the days ahead

From The Series: Higher Unplugged

Play
READ THE STORY
Watch the Full Freeride World Tour Comp in Hakuba
Up Next Ski

Watch the Full Freeride World Tour Comp in Hakuba

Watch the Full Freeride World Tour Comp in Hakuba

Another year, another Freeride World Tour in Hakuba, Japan, and we’re excited to watch TGR Athlete and Sierra Nevada Ambassador Tim Durtschi drop fourth amidst an incredible field of athletes. This will be the first FWT event of the 2020 season and it all starts today. Watch live now through January 20th to see if we will have another Italian ski contingent on the podium after last years’ dominance by Arianna Tricomi and Markus Eder. Check out who on the snowboard side of freeride is going

Play
READ THE STORY
Video: Learn How to Manage Cornices with Xavier de le Rue
Up Next Snowboard

Video: Learn How to Manage Cornices with Xavier de le Rue

Video: Learn How to Manage Cornices with Xavier de le Rue

Cornices, overhanging masses of snow and ice, are some of the most dangerous features skiers and snowboarders can encounter in the mountains. Whether a rider is above or below a cornice, they are in danger. Luckily, cornices aren't something that most skiers have to deal with, as they form almost exclusively in what many would term "extreme terrain." RELATED: Watch a Massive Skier-Triggered Slide on Taylor Mountain For those who don't want to watch the video, here are the key points.

Play
READ THE STORY
Travis Rice and Craig McMorris Snowboard Natural Arches in AK
Up Next Snowboard

Travis Rice and Craig McMorris Snowboard Natural Arches in AK

Travis Rice and Craig McMorris Snowboard Natural Arches in AK

There's nothing that gets Travis Rice fired up more than snowboarding through natural arches in uncomfortably tight couloirs. He's got an uncanny knack for finding these features in the wild, and this time he's not alone. Mark McMorris has joined him on his quest for the latest installment of the series. McMorris is a newbie when it comes to this style of AK snowboarding, but who better to learn from than Travis Rice himself. RELATED: Immerse Yourself in Jackson's Deepest February on