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Jeremy Jones - Sony Mind’s Eye: Season 2 Episode 2

With the calmer temps of spring nearly upon us, snow camping seems like a sexy activity for excitable backcountry riders.

It sounds so idyllic—cut out a sweet fort in the snow to protect your tent from the wind and build snow benches, a snow bar, and hell even a snow fire pit to keep you warm. You and your raddest buddies can then enjoy an unfettered view of the Milky Way with the guarantee of first tracks in the morning. Sweet, right?

There’s just one big drawback: come morning, everything is frozen—including your boots. Dealing with those damn bear traps when they’ve been dried and toasted by the fireplace is bad enough, but that sixth toe and heel blister are really going to feel the hurt when your liners are a damp frozen cave and the shells are as stiff as rebar.

Still, this has never stopped TGR’s in-house snow camping aficionado, Jeremy Jones, from conquering the 3,000 foot hikes necessary to gain access to his favorite spine walls. In this case, these hikes led to a few prized spring lines in the East Alaska Range.

While shooting for Higher last April, Jones and Ryland Bell spent their nights camping and their days riding epic lines. The duo filmed their exploits using Sony’s Action Cam. The resulting footage captures both the realities of camp life, as well as the sweet rewards that make waking up to frozen boots so worthwhile.

All footage shot on Sony's Action Cam, for which Jer has high praise: "This latest one (the new white AS100V) that we just got has stepped up on all fronts; it’s more weather resistant so it doesn’t require a case and I love the huge improvement in the tripod screw mount so mounting is really simple, bomber, and low-profile. And then the visual - in the footage we’re looking at now, we can definitely tell an improvement in the sensor. And the audio continues to kick ass.”

Drop in with TGR.

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From The Series: Sony Mind’s Eye

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VIDEO: Finding Solace
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