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Skiing ... in San Marino

countries_skied++;

San Marino!

It is the 58th country.

Although I can't say there was snow... but rocks on the path from the top of Monte Titano will do. I started from Cesta, the castle at the highest point on Monte Titano at 756 meters, and the rock-floored path down provides a surprisingly good sliding for my plastic "mini skis" by Orthex, the proud sponsor of my blog.

I had never been to San Marino before, and it was an amazing experience also in other ways. The festival to celebrate the victory over fascists was held on the weekend that we visited. There were shows, people dressed in historical clothing, etc. And just the drive up to this tiny nation's mountain peak was a thrill. And the walks on the mountain between the castles were wonderful, night and day. Much recommended.

This blog article is also available on Blogspot. Tämä blogiartikkeli löytyy myös suomeksi Relaasta. All the Planetskier articles can be found fromPlanetskier.net.

Photos and videos (c) 2018 by Jari Arkko. All rights reserved.

I have seen similar videos over the internet and it has raised questions on my mind regarding the damage these courses can cause to the ski blades? Since these are rough surfaces, couldn’t this activity leave some abrasions on the surface?
computer tech support

    Maintaining historic places for future generations intact is important!

    I considered the damage possibility (of course). Had I skied on regular skis with metal sides, it would have been a danger. With relatively soft plastic-only skis… most likely not. At least not on a walking path that sees a quite a lot of walkers and occasional vehicles.

    (My skis are “mini-skis”, not blades.)

Thanks for the update, Its look good…

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