Sign In:

×

Last Step!

Please enter your public display name and a secure password.

Plan to post in the forums? Change your default forum handle here!

×
×

Safety Week: 4 Tips For Fast Rescue Shoveling

The majority of time during an avalanche rescue is spent moving of snow to uncover a buried partner. In the average rescue, several tons of snow must be moved. Moving this much snow takes not only time, but is physically extremely taxing. In order to maximize efficiency, thereby decreasing the time it takes to uncover an airway for a buried victim, here are 4 simple steps to strategic rescue shoveling.

1: Have a shovel easily accessible in your pack

Fumbling with complicated zippers, or having to move stuff around in your pack to access your rescue shovel takes up precious time when it is needed most. Always carry your shovel in a dedicated outside pocket of your snow pack, or have it be easily accessible in an inside pocket, not buried beneath layers of clothing or your camera.

2: Start shoveling downhill of a probe strike.

Once you have a achieved a positive probe strike, leave the probe in that exact location and start digging at a spot downhill to the victim, moving uphill as you progress. Remember, you are digging for an entire person, so you will have to move A LOT of snow. Remember, dig in, not down.

3: Create a “Flying V”

When digging with a group, use a “Flying V” formation to move snow efficiently. A point shoveler uses their shovel to cut large blocks and moves them backwards along both lines of the V. Shovelers to the rear keep passing the snow back, the rearmost shovelers clear the blocks downhill. The point shoveler does the most work, so make sure to rotate positions every 90 seconds to keep moving snow as fast as possible.

4 : Dig to the side of the victim to create a platform

Avalanches are violent forces of nature, and will likely injure those caught in them. This means that once you have uncovered a victim, they will likely need medical attention like CPR. Once you have reached the victim, dig to the side to create a platform at the same height as them in order to have a place to provide immediate medical attention if necessary. 

Play
READ THE STORY
Take A Look Into Bobby Brown’s Wild One-Shot Mammoth Run
Up Next Ski

Take A Look Into Bobby Brown’s Wild One-Shot Mammoth Run

Take A Look Into Bobby Brown’s Wild One-Shot Mammoth Run

Last winter freeskier Bobby Brown teamed up with famed follow cam filmer Matt Cook–AKA "Ski Chef"–to film a flowy top-to-bottom park line down Mammoth Mountain entirely in one take. Brown claimed it was one of the most difficult film projects he's ever undertaken, just because of all the variables. Everything had to go perfect, from the jumps they had built to the wind, Matt keeping up with Bobby, and then Bobby actually landing all the tricks.  Imagine linking together a run of tricks from

Play
READ THE STORY
Laurent De Martin Had One Of The Best All-Around Seasons Of 2017
Up Next Ski

Laurent De Martin Had One Of The Best All-Around Seasons Of 2017

Laurent De Martin Had One Of The Best All-Around Seasons Of 2017

With the latest ski movies featuring the classic formula of an urban segment, backcountry segment and a park shoot, it's become more and more rare to see one skier in all of them. That's exactly what Sweedish freeskier Laurent de Martin did while filming for the latest Level 1 feature,   Laurent spent his 2017 season touring the globe, road tripping through BC in search of pillows, driving the streets of Moscow to scout rails and getting in a mega park jump session at Mammoth during

Play
READ THE STORY
Crazy Karl And Lucas Wachs Go Full Blast In Their New Short Film “Barking At The Door”
Up Next Ski

Crazy Karl And Lucas Wachs Go Full Blast In Their New Short Film “Barking At The Door”

Crazy Karl And Lucas Wachs Go Full Blast In Their New Short Film “Barking At The Door”

Karl Fostvedt and Lucas Wachs have become renowned for having some of the most playful styles and biggest sets of cajones in backcountry skiing. Last year the two teamed up with filmer Jasper Newton and the Good Company crew to film their first short film "Barking at the Door". The duo of Lucas and Karl's skiing combined with Jasper's eye and the Good Company production makes for one the most entertaining and eye-popping ski films of late. The boys hit the iconic Chad's Gap jump, where Karl