Sign In:

×

Last Step!

Please enter your public display name and a secure password.

Plan to post in the forums? Change your default forum handle here!

×
×

“Know Before You Go” Is Huge Step in Avalanche Awareness PSA

Editor's Note: This editorial was originally published in 2014, when "Know Before You Go" first launched. It's information still remains relevant to backcountry skiing and riding.

As the season gets nearer–underway, even, in some places–a host of new programs will seek to get your attention to educate you on the dangers of skiing and riding in avalanche terrain, and how to mitigate those dangers through equipment, knowledge, and most importantly, good decision-making. 

STAY SAFE: Check out TGR's Safety Week content, from survival stories to to decision-making frameworks.

A new piece from a huge collaboration of partners–The Utah Avalanche Center, the Colorado Avalanche Information Center, Avalanche Canada, Backcountry Access, the American Avalanche Association, the American Institute of Avalanche Research and Education, and the National Avalanche Center–is called Know Before You Go, and offers up a really cool, crisp, and graphically compelling PSA about rolling in uncontrolled terrain.

Watch all 15 minutes, and then check out KBYG.org for all the info, which include the framework for an hour-long seminar on basic avalanche awareness. Stay safe this winter!

Here mentioned the challenging hard work done by the mountain climbers through the hill valley. A host of new programs will seek to get your louvre plan your visit attention to educate you on the dangers of skiing and riding in avalanche terrain, and how to mitigate those dangers through equipment, knowledge etc.

Stay in the ski area, transplants.

Play
READ THE STORY
Aspen Avalanche Could be a ‘300-year event’
Up Next News

Aspen Avalanche Could be a ‘300-year event’

Aspen Avalanche Could be a ‘300-year event’

The mile-wide avalanche that happened in Aspen Highlands on March 9th certainly felt out of the norm. It was a nightmare that released naturally, charging over 3000 feet and destroying trees like toothpicks as it piled into the Conundrum Creek Valley. RELATED: Colorado’s Red Mountain Pass to Close Indefinitely Because of Avalanches Turns out local experts speculate it to be a 300-year event. According to the Vail Daily, Art Mears, an engineer from Gunnison, has been taking a closer look into

Play
READ THE STORY
Video: Skier Nearly Smokes Jerry at Mach 4
Up Next Ski

Video: Skier Nearly Smokes Jerry at Mach 4

Video: Skier Nearly Smokes Jerry at Mach 4

We'll start with a quick refresh on skiing etiquette: Downhill skiers have the right of way. Yes, it's super annoying when you're arcing some turns down a groomer and all of a sudden rental-boots-over-jeans-guy makes an erratic 90+ degree swerve into your fall line. However, it's still your responsibility to avoid crashing into him. Related: Man Survives for Weeks on Saltine Sandwiches Why didn't the cameraman spot his buddy's landing? Nuking into a seemingly-blind air on a busy groomer is

Play
READ THE STORY
Skiing the Utah Desert Is a One-of-a-Kind Experience
Up Next Ski

Skiing the Utah Desert Is a One-of-a-Kind Experience

Skiing the Utah Desert Is a One-of-a-Kind Experience

Ever since Ian and Neil Provo showed off their backyard in their iconic short film , the prospect of skiing and snowboarding among the red dirt of southern Utah has been high on the list. Of course, the conditions required for such an adventure are about as rare as finding first tracks down Cody Peak these days, but skiers Rob Aseltine, Willie Nelson, and Dan Rihm made it happen during a recent storm cycle. RELATED: Skiing Utah’s 24 Inches in 24 Hours Storm In Aseltine’s words: “The rarity of