Sign In:

×

Last Step!

Please enter your public display name and a secure password.

Plan to post in the forums? Change your default forum handle here!

×
×

Bruxelles Ski de Plastique

Brussels has run out. They do not have enough for themselves, let alone for Greece. The Eurocrisis is getting worse. We're out of snow.

Well, there's really no snow in Brusseles, but fortunately they have come up with ways to deal with this difficult situation. Some years ago I found indoor ski slopes from Peer and Comines villages.

I am proud of my ability to find potential ski places. But I was blissfully unaware of a great slope not too far from the centre of Brussels. My friend and avid skier Catharina (CC) moved to Brussels some time ago, and found Yeti Ski. Interestingly, none of the locals that I asked about this had ever heard of the place. Yeti Ski resides in Anderlecht, near other sports venues and ten kilometres from the centre.

A networking conference took me to Brussels for a couple of days in April. This allowed us to go explore this plastic hill on one of the evenings, after the conference.

The hill is kept wet by sprinklers placed every few meters across the whole slope. Skiing wet plastic is surprisingly challenging. Both of us were recovering, I was trying to heal my broken ribs and CC was dealing with a flu. We skied only a couple of runs, but it was clear that practicing on this hill would improve anyone's skiing skills.

One difference to real snow is that it is much more difficult for your skis to get a grip on the plastic. Braking and turning needs to be done much more aggressively.

I can recommend a visit here, if you are in Brussels! You should take some protective clothing with you, i.e., long pants, long sleeves, and gloves. Falling on the plastic can hurt you otherwise.

Photos and videos (c) 2016 by Jari Arkko. This blog is also available at Blogspot. Tämä blogi löytyy myös suomeksi Relaasta.

Play
READ THE STORY
Video: 69 Year-Old Skier Catches Some Air in the Park
Up Next Ski

Video: 69 Year-Old Skier Catches Some Air in the Park

Video: 69 Year-Old Skier Catches Some Air in the Park

Steve Katz isn't your average senior-skier. Whereas many 60+ year-old skiers stick to the groomers, he has no trouble getting rad in the park. Maybe he doesn't have all four triples, but that's understandable considering that he was 40 when the first terrain park was built. Related: Alyeska's Slush Cup Is Pond Skimming At Its Finest It's not exactly a big-air edit, but Katz has some serious style. From his sleeveless onesie to bitchin' shades, his outfit looks straight out of a Bunch edit.

Play
READ THE STORY
Video: ‘The Fifty’ Team Breaks Down a Remote Backcountry Rescue
Up Next Ski

Video: ‘The Fifty’ Team Breaks Down a Remote Backcountry Rescue

Video: ‘The Fifty’ Team Breaks Down a Remote Backcountry Rescue

Cody Townsend and Bjarne Salen's , a series in which they are attempting to climb and ski every line detailed in is both inspiring and harrowing. A major theme in each episode is risk management, as just about every line involves significant uncertainty and danger. Cody does an excellent job explaining his rationale for nearly every decision made in the course of each prospective ascent and descent, lending the series an element of realism often lacking in extreme-skiing videos. Related: The

Play
READ THE STORY
Video: Top 5 Crashes From FWT19
Up Next Ski

Video: Top 5 Crashes From FWT19

Video: Top 5 Crashes From FWT19

Athletes on the Freeride World Tour go big and fast. An unfortunate side effect of nuking down steep and sketchy lines is that when falls happen, they aren't gentle. In fact, they are almost invariably of the "Holy-shit-is-he/she-still alive" variety.  Related: Álvaro Penadés Triggers a Spring Avalanche in the Pyrenees With so many strong contenders for Best Crash, it's certain that there was vigorous debate at FWT headquarters over who would make the top five. If we're being honest, there's