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Tony Hawk Kills the Game and Drops New Skate Edit

At 51, Tony Hawk is a dad and businessman, but he still hasn’t given up the sport that made him a household name in the ‘90s. After completing the first known 900 in the sport, he became known as the most famous skateboarder of all time. He also became a hero to millennials when his Tony Hawk's Pro Skater video game series debuted in 1999. Setting fame and fortune aside, Hawk shows us in his latest skate edit that family and skateboarding are his top priorities.

RELATED: Tony Hawk Lands His Last 900 at the Age of 48

Using his platform, Hawk has been working with municipalities and community groups to help them realize their dream of a quality public skatepark in their community through the Tony Hawk Foundation.

“The Tony Hawk Foundation fosters lasting improvements in society with an emphasis on supporting youth in low-income communities through skateboarding programs and the creation of skateparks,” states Hawk. For him, skateboarding was a healthy outlet and a recreational challenge, and it provided a social group of creative, like-minded individuals. It’s also a sport that helped him build confidence, taught him to persevere, and through his mentoring of younger skaters helped him develop leadership skills. 

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Video: Kayakers Too Close To Calving Glacier
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Video: Kayakers Too Close To Calving Glacier

Video: Kayakers Too Close To Calving Glacier

Two friends on a camping and kayaking trip in Alaska got more than they bargained for when they were almost killed by a calving glacier. After setting up camp by the Spencer glacier, the two decided to inflate their packrafts and explore by water. Hearing parts of the glacier collapsing into the water, they paddled over to check out the commotion, and after coming very close to the glacier, sat back and watched the action from what they hoped would be a safe distance. Soon after, an

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Is This the Hardest Single-Pitch Trad Climb on Earth?
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Is This the Hardest Single-Pitch Trad Climb on Earth?

Is This the Hardest Single-Pitch Trad Climb on Earth?

Climbing hard routes is a labor of love. Sometimes it takes days, weeks, even years to complete a project at the outer extremities of someone’s climbing ability. For anyone who’s ever embarked on such a journey, completion and closure offers the ultimate reward. For Italian climber Jacopo Larcher, that process is no different – except this climb might actually be the hardest single pitch trad climb ever done. RELATED: Rise of Red - Official Trailer His line is what he describes as a

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Paddling 400 Km To Learn Happiness Fits In A Kayak
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Paddling 400 Km To Learn Happiness Fits In A Kayak

Paddling 400 Km To Learn Happiness Fits In A Kayak

The River’s Call is many things. At its most simple, it is a story of six kayakers on a 400 km journey down the Apurimac River in Peru. But it is also a story of voluntary struggle; a calm meditation on what drives people to put themselves through physical and mental pain in the search of nothing. Something the soothing voice of the film calls “the modern man paradox. Or the art of putting yourself in a crappy situation.” The river the band of kayakers float is a pristine one. It flows from