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Mountain Goat Airlift Project Continues in Olympic NP

Mountain goats aren't native to Olympic National Park, yet they live there in large numbers. Mountain goats are native to the North Cascades, but their populations there have been depleted, according to the National Park Service. Over the past few years, the NPS has pursued an ambitious plan intended to solve both issues by moving non-native Olympic National Park goats to their depleted range in the North Cascades. This all sounds very logical and boring, but the plan's implementation is far from boring. 

RELATED: Four Hiker Airlifted Off Colorado's Maroon Peak

Per the Park Service's plan, the wild goats are captured using tranquilizer darts or net guns, placed in a specially-designed sling attached to a helicopter, and stored in crates. The crates are transported to the North Cascades in refrigerated trucks, and then flown up into the mountains, where the goats are released in their native habitat. 

Mountain goats can be quite aggressive. A 63-year-old man was killed by one while hiking in Olympic National Park in 2010, an incident which highlighted the goat issue and spurred agencies responsible for wildlife management into action. 

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Watch the Official Trailer for Jeremy Jones’ “Purple Mountains”
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Watch the Official Trailer for Jeremy Jones’ “Purple Mountains”

Watch the Official Trailer for Jeremy Jones’ “Purple Mountains”

Our outdoor playgrounds are in peril and our votes this November will decide their future. Professional snowboarder Jeremy Jones has watched winters change drastically during his 45 years spent in the mountains. More extreme weather, fewer snow days, and economic strain on mountain towns. And yet, climate change remains a divisive issue. In the new film , Jeremy seeks common ground in the heart of America's purple states, having honest discussions with individuals who don't see eye to eye

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Here’s What it’s Like to be Caught in a Bison Stampede
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Here’s What it’s Like to be Caught in a Bison Stampede

Here’s What it’s Like to be Caught in a Bison Stampede

No, thank you. This video is a great reminder of how I never want to be caught in a bison stampede. It is unknown what caused this tsunami wave of fuzzy Prius-sized mammals to charge through the Yellowstone National Park traffic. My guess is that a middle-aged woman with an iPad spooked them while trying to get photos for family back home. Damn it, Karen, why can’t you just stay on the boardwalk?! Jokes aside, we’re glad that no one was hurt from this uncomfortably close wildlife

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Make a Plan to Vote with Protect Our Winters
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Make a Plan to Vote with Protect Our Winters

Make a Plan to Vote with Protect Our Winters

If we want to protect the places we love—our mountains, forests, deserts, or oceans—it starts by voting. Sounds simple, right? However, our track record isn’t too great: Thirty-five percent of 18-29-year-olds, who said they “definitely voted” in the 2014 midterm election, in fact, didn't actually vote. Yikes. We can do better this November and Protect Our Winters wants to make the process as easy as possible. RELATED: Make a Plan to Vote with Protect Our Winters Protect Our Winters’ Make A