Sign In:

×

Last Step!

Please enter your public display name and a secure password.

Plan to post in the forums? Change your default forum handle here!

×
×

1% for the Planet Makes it Effortless to Support the Outdoors

On our film posters, trailers, and credits you may have noticed the recurring logo for 1% for the Planet. No, they’re not a title sponsor of our projects, inversely, we support the important work that they’re doing for the environment. Right now only 3% of philanthropy is directed to environmental causes, and 1% for the Planet is hoping to be the catalyst to expand that statistic.

RELATED: Alex Honnold Seeks a Sustainable Future Through Solar

In 2002, Patagonia’s Yvon Chouinard and Blue Ribbon Flies’ Craig Mathews had a wild idea: What if their businesses gave 1% of their sales back to the planet, regardless if they had a profitable year or not. On top of this, they found that finding the right nonprofits to support can be a tricky process. Their thought was to streamline the process by creating a middleman to connect philanthropic individuals and businesses with organizations already doing good work on the ground. That simple concept snowballed into a global movement, known as 1% for the Planet. 18 years later they’ve raised over $225 million for environmental nonprofits and are only looking to grow.

1% for the Planet partners with organizations like Surfers Against Sewage which is a marine conservation charity working to protect oceans. Richie Graham Photo.

1% for the Planet’s focus is distilled into six main issues: climate, food, land, pollution, water, and wildlife. From each of these core issues, the organization curates a group of nonprofits that can address these particular problems in a very intentional way. TGR has been a longtime partner with the cause, alongside brands like Patagonia, Klean Kanteen, and Caudalie, to name just a few. Currently, 1% for the Planet is partnered with over 2700 business members, and they’re growing. But the beauty of this organization is that it’s not just for businesses and corporations. Individuals are making a difference too. If you’ve been itching to do more for the outdoors, 1% for the Planet makes it almost effortless. Here are a few simple ways to get involved:

Become a Member 

Through this membership, you’re brought into a diverse and expansive global network of businesses and organizations already actively supporting environmental initiatives. Plus, there is full freedom to leverage your contributions to support the issues you care most about. Say you’re really fired up about climate change? They’ve got a whole list of partners to pick and choose from. Giving is straightforward and their suggested amount is 1% of your salary each year. To put that perspective, if you earn $40,000 annually that would be about $33 a month, so ultimately sacrificing a few lattes before work. If money is an issue there’s no need to fret, your time is just as valuable and can be donated through volunteer work. Learn more here.

Check out all the goodies included with the My Planet Pass. 1% for the Planet Photo.

Get a My Planet Pass  

Basically, the My Planet Pass is like a ski pass, but for protecting our oceans, forests, species, and etc. This is a great option for someone who wants a bit more guidance and wants to make a one-time purchase verse a monthly donation. Plus, by purchasing you automatically become a 1% member for the Planet as well as five other high-impact environmental nonprofit. Purchase a My Planet Pass here.

Purchase for the Planet 

If donating isn’t an option, try supporting brands partnered with 1% for the Planet. For example, if you’re on the hunt for a new jacket, getting one from Patagonia will not only satisfy your needs but also help 1% for the Planet. It’s a win-win situation for everyone. To find brands affiliated with the organization simply head to their business members page

Play
READ THE STORY
Woman Killed in Maine Great White Shark Attack
Up Next News

Woman Killed in Maine Great White Shark Attack

Woman Killed in Maine Great White Shark Attack

At about 3:30PM on July 27th, 2020, 63-year-old Julie Holowach was attacked by a Great White Shark while swimming about 20 yards offshore near Bailey Island, Maine. Nearby kayakers were able to bring Holowach to shore after the attack, but she was pronounced deceased at the scene. RELATED: Mick Fanning is on a Mission to Save the Sharks It was the first reported shark attack in Maine in a decade, and the state's first known deadly shark attack. Local authorities are urging swimmers and

Play
READ THE STORY
15-Year-Old Surfer Dies in Australian Shark Attack
Up Next News

15-Year-Old Surfer Dies in Australian Shark Attack

15-Year-Old Surfer Dies in Australian Shark Attack

For the second time in two months, an Australian surfer has died following a shark attack. Last Friday, 15-year-old Mani Hart-Deville was attacked by a great white shark at Wooli Beach in New South Wales. Tragically, Hart-Deville died on the scene due to severe injuries to his legs. In late June, a 60-year-old surfer was killed by a great white shark roughly 150 miles north of Wooli Beach. RELATED: A 60-Year-Old Surfer Was Killed By A Shark in Australia Witnesses say the shark attacked, then

Play
READ THE STORY
Woman Plays Dead While Being Charged by Yellowstone Bison
Up Next News

Woman Plays Dead While Being Charged by Yellowstone Bison

Woman Plays Dead While Being Charged by Yellowstone Bison

If you ever find yourself being charged by a 2,000-pound bison here’s a pro tip: play dead. That’s apparently what a woman did in Yellowstone last Friday when she fell trying to run away from a charging bison. The woman—who remains unnamed—is a Montana local and knew to play dead in that situation. Her quick thinking worked in her favor, allowing her to walk away without a single scratch. RELATED: 72-Year-Old Woman Tried to Photograph Yellowstone Bison, Gets Gored However, the best way to