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Urban Exploration in an Abandoned Railway Tunnel

Today's evening excursion was to an abandoned railroad tunnel. The tunnel is 600 meters long, and in the middle of everything, at a place I've been many times, but I had never heard about the tunnel before.

And what a beauty the tunnel is! The structure seems solid, almost as if was constructed yesterday. Yet on some parts you can see the passage of time, as dripping water forms new things out of the walls.

The usual city termites have been around the tunnel as well, spreading trash and burning their guitars (!) although luckily they seem to have left the darkest middle places of the tunnel alone. And who burns guitars?!? We found two burned guitars in the tunnel.

But while I usually do not support unauthorised street art, I really like it when done in designated places. And in this tunnel... I love it! Amazing!

Sadly, it seems that there is an attempt to fill and block the tunnel. There's really no good reason to do that. Can this be stopped? (Or, if it can not be stopped, could we leave half a meter unfilled under the roof, to make a nice 600m crawl space for cavers?

By the way, I'm not reporting exactly where this tunnel is, for the sake of safety and continued access. Whatever you do, be aware of the safety of yourself and others. Never go alone, and always understand where you are and what the possible dangers in that place might be.

Thanks for Tor for guiding us where this beauty is, Jarmo for once again great photography, and for Velma, Janne, Eetu, and Eino for company.

Photos and videos (c) 2017 by Jari Arkko and Jarmo Ruuth. This blog is also available at the Blogspot site. Tämä blogi löytyy myös suomeksi Relaasta.

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