Sign In:

×

Last Step!

Please enter your public display name and a secure password.

Plan to post in the forums? Change your default forum handle here!

×
×

Urban Exploration in an Abandoned Railway Tunnel

Today's evening excursion was to an abandoned railroad tunnel. The tunnel is 600 meters long, and in the middle of everything, at a place I've been many times, but I had never heard about the tunnel before.

And what a beauty the tunnel is! The structure seems solid, almost as if was constructed yesterday. Yet on some parts you can see the passage of time, as dripping water forms new things out of the walls.

The usual city termites have been around the tunnel as well, spreading trash and burning their guitars (!) although luckily they seem to have left the darkest middle places of the tunnel alone. And who burns guitars?!? We found two burned guitars in the tunnel.

But while I usually do not support unauthorised street art, I really like it when done in designated places. And in this tunnel... I love it! Amazing!

Sadly, it seems that there is an attempt to fill and block the tunnel. There's really no good reason to do that. Can this be stopped? (Or, if it can not be stopped, could we leave half a meter unfilled under the roof, to make a nice 600m crawl space for cavers?

By the way, I'm not reporting exactly where this tunnel is, for the sake of safety and continued access. Whatever you do, be aware of the safety of yourself and others. Never go alone, and always understand where you are and what the possible dangers in that place might be.

Thanks for Tor for guiding us where this beauty is, Jarmo for once again great photography, and for Velma, Janne, Eetu, and Eino for company.

Photos and videos (c) 2017 by Jari Arkko and Jarmo Ruuth. This blog is also available at the Blogspot site. Tämä blogi löytyy myös suomeksi Relaasta.

Play
READ THE STORY
VIDEO: Quarantined Italian Climber Puts Up Bold New FA
Up Next Adventure

VIDEO: Quarantined Italian Climber Puts Up Bold New FA

VIDEO: Quarantined Italian Climber Puts Up Bold New FA

Enrico Veronese didn’t let the living nightmare that is currently Northern Italy prevent him from pushing the limits of his sport. With strict orders to remain inside to prevent the spread of Coronavirus, Veronese put up a bold first ascent of a new route. The new climb, is rated at 55° E5, M9, 5.14a, making it one of the hardest of its genre (whatever that genre may be). It even included a ski descent of his driveway and a bivy on a sketchy ledge (READ: his balcony.) RELATED: Stay

Play
READ THE STORY
Video: Proximity Speedflying Looks Even Sketchier Than Wingsuiting
Up Next Adventure

Video: Proximity Speedflying Looks Even Sketchier Than Wingsuiting

Video: Proximity Speedflying Looks Even Sketchier Than Wingsuiting

If you're looking for a sport where the main goal is to get close to death without actually dying, proximity wingsuiting is hard to beat. That said, we can't keep sleeping on proximity speedflying, which clearly approaches, if not eclipses wingsuiting's inherent sketchiness. RELATED: Proximity Wingsuiting in the Alps How much is risking your life like this worth? $22,222 USD, based on evidence provided by this GoPro Million Dollar Challenge-awarded video from Kiwi speedflyer Angus Sellen. For

Play
READ THE STORY
Mountain of Storms: Yvon Chouinard’s 1968 Ascent of Fitz Roy
Up Next Adventure

Mountain of Storms: Yvon Chouinard’s 1968 Ascent of Fitz Roy

Mountain of Storms: Yvon Chouinard’s 1968 Ascent of Fitz Roy

Sure, people are climbing harder routes these days, but in 1968, it was still a guaranteed full-on adventure. That’s exactly what the Fun Hogs – Yvon Chouinard, Doug Tompkins, Chris Jones, Dick Dorworth, and Lito Tejada-Flores – were in for during their legendary 5,000-mile road trip from California to Patagonia in 1968. Their goal was to summit Cerro Fitz Roy, but they knew the trip would encompass so much more than that. RELATED: Stay Stoked - Your Guide to TGR's Best Free Content Mountain