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This Film Celebrates the Climbing Porters and Sherpa of K2

Climbing the world’s second-highest peak, K2, is more than just feat of athleticism. It’s a feat of logistics, teamwork, and dedication from all the players who make up a climbing expedition. It’s the climbers who often the only ones remembered, but despite being paid at rates far below those received by international expedition leaders, the local porters and support crew deserve just as much credit. Without them, critical supplies in base camp or high-altitude tasks that counts as some of the most difficult and dangerous work on the mountain for supporting climbers would never get done. They are the Invisible Footmen, and this film tells the story of their lives.

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Filmmaker Iara Lee takes a deep dive into the lives of Pakistani porters and Nepalese Sherpa who provide critical support to expeditions on K2. For westerners, Pakistan often conjures up a nation of conflict and never-ending war, but the reality in this part of the world is often far from that. The film follows the story of a 2014 expedition of former porters who became the first official all-Pakistani climbing team to successfully summit the mountain in celebration of the 60th anniversary of the first summit.

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Great film! Celebrating events and milestones like this is what truly makes us humans. We are able to appreciate things that require hard training and talent. Great share! Thanks for sharing! House Painter

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Vanlife Tour: Jack Campion’s VW Crafter Mobile Chalet
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Vanlife Tour: Jack Campion’s VW Crafter Mobile Chalet

Vanlife Tour: Jack Campion’s VW Crafter Mobile Chalet

If you enjoy adventures in the great outdoors, odds are that you're not content staying put in one place for too long. There are simply too many places to go and things to do for an adventurer to remain happy in a single locale. Combined with the ludicrous cost of living in many mountain towns, this desire for mobility and flexibility has led to the rise in "vanlife," a phenomenon in which spend copious amounts of time and money transforming commercial vans into mobile, self-contained homes.

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The North Face Unveils ‘PERSPECTIVES’, A Film Series Exploring Change
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The North Face Unveils ‘PERSPECTIVES’, A Film Series Exploring Change

The North Face Unveils ‘PERSPECTIVES’, A Film Series Exploring Change

Change is a constant of life. We can’t control change, but we have autonomy over how we react to it. For folks who thrive in the outdoors, this rings especially true. We’re constantly at the mercy of Mother Nature, coping with changing elements, seasons, conditions, or goals. For someone like filmmaker Renan Ozturk, his life was always dictated by climbing. It was his compass, guiding him from one grand adventure to the next. But Ozturk wouldn’t be the filmmaker he is today had he never

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Courtney Conlogue Paddled 32 miles for Charity
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Courtney Conlogue Paddled 32 miles for Charity

Courtney Conlogue Paddled 32 miles for Charity

Professional surfer Courtney Conlogue is used to spending copious amounts of time in the ocean, but last Saturday was something entirely different for her. Starting from the Catalina Channel, Conlogue got in the water and began paddling until she hit the sand of Huntington beach seven hours and 45 minutes later. Conlogue originally came up with the idea for the 32-mile challenge during her recovery from a brain injury. She hoped that the grueling paddle would not only push her limits but also