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This Film Celebrates the Climbing Porters and Sherpa of K2

Climbing the world’s second-highest peak, K2, is more than just feat of athleticism. It’s a feat of logistics, teamwork, and dedication from all the players who make up a climbing expedition. It’s the climbers who often the only ones remembered, but despite being paid at rates far below those received by international expedition leaders, the local porters and support crew deserve just as much credit. Without them, critical supplies in base camp or high-altitude tasks that counts as some of the most difficult and dangerous work on the mountain for supporting climbers would never get done. They are the Invisible Footmen, and this film tells the story of their lives.

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Filmmaker Iara Lee takes a deep dive into the lives of Pakistani porters and Nepalese Sherpa who provide critical support to expeditions on K2. For westerners, Pakistan often conjures up a nation of conflict and never-ending war, but the reality in this part of the world is often far from that. The film follows the story of a 2014 expedition of former porters who became the first official all-Pakistani climbing team to successfully summit the mountain in celebration of the 60th anniversary of the first summit.

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Great film! Celebrating events and milestones like this is what truly makes us humans. We are able to appreciate things that require hard training and talent. Great share! Thanks for sharing! House Painter

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​TGR x HBO Present: Edge of the Earth Official Trailer
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​TGR x HBO Present: Edge of the Earth Official Trailer

​TGR x HBO Present: Edge of the Earth Official Trailer

Teton Gravity Research and HBO have teamed up to bring you the all-new documentary film series  Directed by Steve and Todd Jones, EDGE OF THE EARTH brings you an immersive blend of action-adventure sport, travel journal, and nature documentary, following four different groups of elite action-adventure athletes on four unique, never-before accomplished missions within undiscovered realms of nature. Starting with an Alaskan winter ski and snowboard expedition, reaching the heights of a first

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Marc-André‘s Vision - A New Line on Torre Egger
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Marc-André‘s Vision - A New Line on Torre Egger

Marc-André‘s Vision - A New Line on Torre Egger

Marc-André Leclerc’s death in 2018 sent shockwaves through the climbing and greater action sports community. He was a visionary and an iconoclast who climbed solely for the love of the sport and his impact on climbing will be felt for many years to come. Prior to his passing, Marc-André had spotted an unclimbed route on the east face of the legendary Torre-Egger peak in the Southern Patagonian Icefield as he rapelled from a nearby route called Titanic. He made plans to climb this route with

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​VIDEO: Arnaud Jeraud Completes 120m World Record Freedive
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​VIDEO: Arnaud Jeraud Completes 120m World Record Freedive

​VIDEO: Arnaud Jeraud Completes 120m World Record Freedive

French freediver Arnaud Jeraud just broke his own world record for deepest freedive at 120 meters at the prestigious Vertical Blue competition in the Bahamas. His 3 minute 34 second dive was done using bi-fins, a discipline he has specialized in. While the breath hold period might not actually be that long, it’s the crushing pressure of the 120-meter depth that really does it. Besides, the first thing that crossed my mind when watching this was “man…it’s so dark down