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The North Face Presents: Trango Towers

For anyone who’s ever looked up a picture of the Trango Towers, the fearsome granite monoliths that stand atop Pakistan’s Baltoro Glacier, you might have wondered what it would take to climb them. Great Trango Tower, the tallest of the pinnacles, is home to the world’s biggest big wall with a vertical section measured at 4,396 feet. Oh yeah, and it tops out at over 20,000 feet, making this a true challenge for only the best alpinists and rock climbers in the world.

RELATED: Dhaulagiri VII Dreams - Ski Mountaineering in Nepal

Last summer, a team of four Chilean climbers - Sebastian Rojas, Diego Señoret, Diego Sáez and Nicolas Gutierrez - made a five-day ascent of a route on Great Trango Tower. While the North Face’s film documenting their adventure is in Spanish, the visuals alone are worth the watch. There’s also always subtitles.

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VIDEO: A Kayaker’s Worst Nightmare
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VIDEO: A Kayaker’s Worst Nightmare

VIDEO: A Kayaker’s Worst Nightmare

It's every kayaker's worst nightmare, getting pushed off line and into a strainer. That's exactly what happened to french kayaker Rapheal Urscheler, who gets pinned under a log while paddling the "Ex du Bas" on the Ubaye river. Luckily for him he was able to keep his head and was able to push off the log and slide under. Everything worked out, but this video serves as a useful reminder on how quickly it can go from bad to good on the river.  RELATED: A Perfect Example of How Not to Kayak

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VIDEO: Extreme Slacklining Under the Northern Lights
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VIDEO: Extreme Slacklining Under the Northern Lights

VIDEO: Extreme Slacklining Under the Northern Lights

In terms of sports which have a difficult learning curve, slacklining is hard to beat. Despite the fact that at some point not too long ago (in evolutionary terms) our ancestors were living in trees, we've quickly evolved to be much more comfortable on flat, stable surfaces. RELATED: Check out the TGR Journal Vol. 1 Highlining is like slacklining, except instead of stringing the line two feet off the ground, highliners seek out spots where their lines can be hung hundreds or even thousands of

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Check Out Nat Geo’s 360 Video of An Everest Expedition
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Check Out Nat Geo’s 360 Video of An Everest Expedition

Check Out Nat Geo’s 360 Video of An Everest Expedition

“Everesting” seems to have been quite the trend lately, that is if you are an endurance athlete willing to push the boundaries of your legs and lungs. Well, for those of us who aren’t quite that strong, or who prefer a good couch sesh over a good sufferfest, Nat Geo has just the thing for you. Nat Geo recently undertook an expedition to the top of the world, not just to climb Everest, but to research climate change at high elevations as part of their Perpetual Planet initiative. Along the