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Chinese Survey Team Reaches Summit of Everest

After months of waiting in Base Camp to acclimatize, and then weeks of waiting for a weather window, the Chinese surveying team on Everest has finally reached the summit of the world’s highest mountain. The 16 climbers who summited are the first humans to stand atop the world this year, with COVID-19 closures in effect on both the Nepalese and Chinese sides of the mountain. The team is on the mountain to take new measurements of the summit elevation. For many years, the official height stood at 8848 meters (29,029 feet) but following the 2015 earthquake in Nepal and the fact that mountains change over time, it was time to make a new measurement. A highly accurate GPS reading was taken from the summit, but the result has not been published.

RELATED: Check Out Vol.1 Of The TGR Journal

While the surveying team summited on May 27, another commercial team is working their way up the mountain. Favorable weather will likely put another 20 climbers on top today or tomorrow.

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VIDEO: A Kayaker’s Worst Nightmare
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VIDEO: A Kayaker’s Worst Nightmare

VIDEO: A Kayaker’s Worst Nightmare

It's every kayaker's worst nightmare, getting pushed off line and into a strainer. That's exactly what happened to french kayaker Rapheal Urscheler, who gets pinned under a log while paddling the "Ex du Bas" on the Ubaye river. Luckily for him he was able to keep his head and was able to push off the log and slide under. Everything worked out, but this video serves as a useful reminder on how quickly it can go from bad to good on the river.  RELATED: A Perfect Example of How Not to Kayak

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VIDEO: Extreme Slacklining Under the Northern Lights
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VIDEO: Extreme Slacklining Under the Northern Lights

VIDEO: Extreme Slacklining Under the Northern Lights

In terms of sports which have a difficult learning curve, slacklining is hard to beat. Despite the fact that at some point not too long ago (in evolutionary terms) our ancestors were living in trees, we've quickly evolved to be much more comfortable on flat, stable surfaces. RELATED: Check out the TGR Journal Vol. 1 Highlining is like slacklining, except instead of stringing the line two feet off the ground, highliners seek out spots where their lines can be hung hundreds or even thousands of

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Check Out Nat Geo’s 360 Video of An Everest Expedition
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Check Out Nat Geo’s 360 Video of An Everest Expedition

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“Everesting” seems to have been quite the trend lately, that is if you are an endurance athlete willing to push the boundaries of your legs and lungs. Well, for those of us who aren’t quite that strong, or who prefer a good couch sesh over a good sufferfest, Nat Geo has just the thing for you. Nat Geo recently undertook an expedition to the top of the world, not just to climb Everest, but to research climate change at high elevations as part of their Perpetual Planet initiative. Along the