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The Cinder Cone Might Be The Treehouse That Can’t Be Topped

Levitating in a stand of Douglar Fir trees on the Washington side of the Columbia River Gorge, the incredible treehouse dubbed The Cinder Cone is the culmination of a full year of creative carpentry and hipster can-do. The 'Cone took a group of friends from around the country, some professional woodworkers, some hacks, to put together the plans and materials and actually build the twin 220 square-foot living spaces, along with the handsome skate bowl and wood fired hot tub. As it stands now, it could easily be a stand-in for a future Wes Anderson homestead.

RELATED: Surf with Orcas, sleep in treehouses at Tatchu Surf Adventures

This is only the latest departure from the norm for photographer Foster Huntington, who quit New York City in 2011 to take his camera on the road, and ended up documenting the lifestyle of fellow vehicle-based vagabonds for a book he published called Home Is Where You Park It. With the road yearnings waning and a desire for a fixed spot in the ground to call home growing, Foster, who grew to enjoy life in small spaces over the course of his time on the road, brought The Cinder Cone to fruition with friends who were thankfully as capable as they were ambitious.

TGR will be stopping by The Cinder Cone on our way up for the unReal movie premiere in Vancouver later this month, so if you've got a burning treehouse question you want answered, let us know in the comments...

From The Column: Base Camp

I love this set up, but the thing is, the money to buy that property get the tools, supplies and skill trade workers up there to build it must have cost a small fortune that is sooo unrealistic.

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