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Jeremy Jones’ Journal: Silence in the High Sierra

Editor's Note: Last spring big-mountain snowboarding legend Jeremy Jones set out with two-time Olympian Elena Hight on an ambitious foot-powered expedition across California’s John Muir Wilderness. Jeremy documented the journey in a travel journal that recounts their nine-day mission. What follows is his entry from the day 3 of filming for Ode To Muir with photos and videos he captured along the way.

The climb continues. Nick Kalisz photo. Katie Lozancich design. See the official trailer and tour dates for Ode To Muir at: tetongravity.com/odetomuir

“Keep close to Nature's heart... and break clear away, once in awhile, and climb a mountain or spend a week in the woods. Wash your spirit clean.” - John Muir

Day Five:

Total silence. No wind, no planes, no birds – this silence is often hard to find, but I have finally found it. The rising sun makes it easy to see the tall peaks. They receive the first sunlight, glowing above the grey – the contrast is stark. Several shades of yellow, orange and pink create a different pallet than the evening colors, but both equally as majestic. The sun seems to rise faster then it sets?

"Perfect, High Sierra, 11,000 foot water. It comes off the rocks, then down into the river, and eventually ends up at a tap in your home." - Jeremy Jones. Nick Kalisz photo. Katie Lozancich design.

My eyes continue to adjust to the landscape, deciphering the rideable lines within the mountain haystack. Snow textures standout in the morning lights. The line that had us put down stakes, just a ridge walk to my right seems to be smooth and holding the best possibility for soft snow in the immediate area. The snow on the South Ridge tells a story of how much wind rips through the pass. Far to my North there is a section of mountains which clearly has seen more snow than the rest. We will head that way next.

With each trip, the map begins to make more sense and my attention becomes more acute to certain sections of the range.

- Jeremy Jones


Made possible by  YETIClif Bar and 
Sierra Nevada. See film tour dates & request a showing in your area at: tetongravity.com/odetomuir

I love the title! It really possess passion, love and living. Reading articles on this blog really makes me become eager to be myself always. Thank you for that .

Freda
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