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A conversation with Jeremy Jones: Kids, poetry, climate, and his new movie, Life of Glide

This...I look back and I realize I have given my life over to this. A love, an obsession, a never-ending pursuit of that feeling.” The feeling that Jeremy Jones describes in the opening lines of his latest movie project is what he calls the “life of glide.”

Jones, pro snowboarder, founder of Protect Our Winters and Jones Snowboards, is set to release his latest film project, Life of Glide, produced by his brothers at Teton Gravity Research. The 14-minute film is a departure for Jones, who most recently completed his epic Deeper, Further, Higher Trilogy, in which he sought out the some of the most remote mountains on the planet, climbing them on his own two feet, and riding down.

I sat down with Jones to get the scoop on this next chapter.

KH: What’s the backstory on this movie?

JJ: In Deeper, Further, and Higher, I was going super remote and risking my life on these intense mountains, and those were fun stories to tell. But there’s this other whole part of my snowboarding that's just as important to me, even more important. It’s going out to my local hill on an average Tuesday, and having a blast in mundane conditions. I look around at the people in the lift lines and on the skin tracks, and there’s this common feeling that we all share. These sports have shaped our lives. They’re what we do in our free time, they define who our friends are, who we marry.

This love of the sport, and the feelings that it brings us: That's what inspired this movie. The way it feels to glide, to execute a turn—whether it’s on a snowboard, skis or a surfboard—the joy, the freedom. It’s what I’ve craved ever since I was a little kid, and it’s what drives me into the mountains today. This movie is a celebration of the turn, and I think it’s something that anyone who loves these sports can relate to, no matter what level they’re performing at. 

Read more of this interview here.

Waxing up my Jones split for the season, hope the Tour comes to Colorado, stoked!

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