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Deeper, Further And Higher Into The Mountains Of Austria

Teton Gravity Research is in the Karwendel Range in Austria filming Jeremy Jones' next film, "Further." Part of the "Deeper," "Further," "Higher" trilogy, each movie is a two-year project about self-propelled snowboarding in the world's most remote mountains. After a great post from Day 1, TGR's Head of Production Jon Klaczkiewicz checks back in to update us with what Jones, Mitch Toelderer, and Bibi Pekarekis are up to Austria. Day 2:No time for jet lag, 4 a.m. wakeup to start skinning from the valley floor in below freezing conditions and I have never been so cold while working so hard. Navigating frozen avalanche debris in the dark and 4,500 vertical feet of kick turn after kick turn later we arrive at the spines. Jeremy drops first into a super aesthetic sloughing line, followed by Bibi and Mitch. One huge climb for three beautiful Austrian lines.

Day 3:I think I logged 12 hours of sleep last night. 7 a.m. and we are back at it again lapping some smaller more tech terrain. Mitch rides a super steep spine: a first descent only possible with the huge winter Austria is having. We call it early to prep for tomorrow. Jeremy, Mitch, and Bibi have scoped a wall dubbed "Mega Ramp," access to which will require a bivy at the top of the mountain tonight.

Day 4:5 a.m. with stars above and moonlit clouds in the valley below. We begin our climb/traverse/climb/traverse/climb and the snow is so cold that our boards barley slide. We start up a narrow coulior and a few small settling wind deposits make travel a bit unnerving as we must continue up some wide open terrain at twilight. Get to the ridge and we're greeted by a biting Siberian wind; we keep moving to try to keep blood flowing toward our extremities. The Mega Ramp reveals itself with a pinnacle of a summit and rowdy face below. Watching Jeremy, Mitch, and Bibi topping out is a sight in itself, followed by edge of your seat descents. The crew heads toward “Middle Earth” three more glorious runs go down followed by another 4,800-foot pow run to the valley below and I can’t believe Austria.

Day 5: Prep today as we are going in tomorrow. The plan is for a 13 kilometer slog into a staging camp where we have two different high camp options from there. More to come ...

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Photo Tour:  Chile After First Major Snowstorm of 2017
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Photo Tour:  Chile After First Major Snowstorm of 2017

Photo Tour:  Chile After First Major Snowstorm of 2017

The first major snowstorm of 2017 has slammed into central Chile bringing an early Mother's Day gift to Valle Nevado, Arpa Snow Cats, El Colorado, La Parva and Portillo resorts.  With over two feet from the May storm and another expected to hit on Wednesday,  Chile's main ski areas could begin to open for the season several weeks ahead of schedule, as early as late May.  Ski season in South America generally operates mid-June to October. We have collected a series of photos from the

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THE MAN, THE MYTH, THE RON
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THE MAN, THE MYTH, THE RON

THE MAN, THE MYTH, THE RON

During Sego Ski Co.'s relatively short history, Ron Murray has become sort of a local legend. His 20-plus years of ski repair experience, combined with his time working in manufacturing and his wholesome philosophy on skiing (and snowboarding) has made Ron an integral part of the Sego team and brand. Ron is pretty much everything you look for in a ski tech. His gentle demeanor breathes wisdom and humility, and it shows in his craft. After all, aren't our skis just an extension of our feet?

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8 Defining Photographs From TGR’s 21 Year History
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8 Defining Photographs From TGR’s 21 Year History

8 Defining Photographs From TGR’s 21 Year History

Greg Von Doersten (or GVD) has been photographing with TGR since the beginning. He met founders Todd and Steve Jones back in the early 90's when they were still skiing for Marmot and filming by themselves with local Jackson Hole crushers. "They were getting it done," Von Doersten told me. "They wanted to see more line skiing and airs in films so they started to develop their own signature thing. I was like 'dang these guys are legit and they are kind of my style.'"   Von Doersten