Sign In:

×

Last Step!

Please enter your public display name and a secure password.

Plan to post in the forums? Change your default forum handle here!

×
×

Whistler Bike Park Opening Day 2016 Report

Editor's Note: Contributor Lee Lau attended the opening day of the Whistler Bike Park for the 2016 summer season and brought back this report. The trails are riding great, lifts are spinning, and while the pirate trails that had nominally been tolerated in the past are now being fully outlawed to comply with new regulations to make the bike park's expansion possible, riders can look forward to plenty of new trail this summer.

With the snow melting and trails drying, people had been waiting with anticipation for Whistler Mountain Bike Park's opening, which happened last Friday, May 20th. Not matter if you're a newb, intermediate, or expert downhill rider, WBP has everything you could want and more. 

Their  website specifies rental rates, but make sure you also check out the lesson prices. Insider tip: if you have to rent gear and buy a ticket, the lesson comes at a nominal cost, so take advantage! Here's the scoop on WBP's lessons, as well as how you can progress.  

EWS Giant Rider Josh Carlson waits to buy his pass. He's here before the lifts even start running! Lee Lau photo.

Mike Johnstone, a long-time Whistler Bike Park employee, and his Peak Leadership Trainees hailing from Mexico, Scotland, Germany, Brazil, the U.S., and Canada. These trainees come to WBP to learn how to instruct, and then take their skills back home. Lee Lau photo. 

Lifts load at an early 9:30AM to get people to the goods. Lee Lau photo. 

Brett Tippie interviews stoked Slovakians. Lee Lau photo.  

The advanced A-Line is looking good! Lee Lau photo.

WBP instructor, Seb Bunney, encourages warming up before taking on the park. His warm-up run of choice: Crank It Up. Lee Lau photo.

Bears and bikes... we all get along. Lee Lau photo. 

We wanted to ride the new Crank It Up More, but unfortunately it's still too wet. Sharon Bader photo.

A-Line's Squirrel Catcher trail. Sharon Bader photo.

With all the trails open in the Fitzsimmons Zone, the season's off to a great start, and the people are already rolling in. 

On another note, Whistler Blackcomb has worked hard to  authorize rogue trails made by the public, providing kosher access to even more connections and climbs. In turn, just respect their efforts by sticking to clearly marked lines. It'd suck to lose biking privileges. 

From The Column: TGR Trip Report Picks

Play
READ THE STORY
2017’s Top 10 Gear/Tech Stories
Up Next Gear & Tech

2017’s Top 10 Gear/Tech Stories

2017’s Top 10 Gear/Tech Stories

While many of us may head to the mountains to escape that dreaded and never-ending pull of computers and electronics, gear and technology are inevitably something we rely on. TGR has always been appreciative of cutting-edge technology, and we choose our gear very wisely, especially since our lives often depend on it. Here are our favorite 10 stories from the gear and tech world from 2017! TGR TESTED: This Year’s Best Mountain Bikes Patagonia Really Wants to Fix Your Shit Mountain Hub’s

Play
READ THE STORY
2018 is Your Year to Enter a Mountain Bike Race
Up Next Bike

2018 is Your Year to Enter a Mountain Bike Race

2018 is Your Year to Enter a Mountain Bike Race

So you’ve decided to cowboy up and get after it. Awesome. Racing is a lot of fun. There’s mountain bikers just like you—A-types, B-types, beer drinkers, hammers—who want to go fast and, if you’ve prepped real hard, maybe get some time on the podium. Nothing impresses the Insta like a podium shot. Here’s TGR’s roadmap to get you to the start line: Pre-step Think of racing as a huge group ride. Don’t get intimidated. Just show up and pedal, dammit. Step 1. Figure out what kind of race

Play
READ THE STORY
Tracing Competitive Mountain Biking’s Development Through 5 Seminal Figures
Up Next Bike

Tracing Competitive Mountain Biking’s Development Through 5 Seminal Figures

Tracing Competitive Mountain Biking’s Development Through 5 Seminal Figures

California’s Marin County is widely regarded as the birthplace of mountain biking. It all started in the early 1970s when a few ambitious and innovative cyclists from this area started making their own mountain bikes from vintage paperboy bikes. These were first known as ‘clunkers’, and they were designed with riding on harsh dirt roads in mind.  Needless to say, mountain biking has come a long way since its early days. Riders went from crawling down hills on bikes not fit for modern