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TGR Podcast: What First Aid Skills Do TGR Athletes Bring To the Backcountry?

Here at TGR, we're big on education. While sports and classrooms are rarely intertwined, for the increasing numbers of skiers and riders that are now heading into the backcountry in search of powder and adventure, education is an absolutely critical component to having a good time and keeping the risk down. And while avalanche education is the biggest skillset many of us seek to brush up on at the beginning of every season, wilderness rescue, and wilderness first aid, are just as crucial. After all, if an avalanche takes out a partner of yours, a Level I avalanche course may only get you the skills to get that victim out of the snow. But then what?

In this 15-minute podcast, Dave Webber–Denali Wilderness Ranger, lead instructor at Remote Rescue Training, and a senior field instructor for the National Outdoor Leadership School–provides a high-level overview of what he teaches to every TGR athlete at the beginning of the season as far as wilderness first aid and rescue is concerned. While specialized towards the unique demands of pro riders attending TGR's International Pro Riders' Workshop, Dave imparts lessons, from trusting your gut to knowing the difference between a critically injured victim and one that can wait around for a longer rescue, that every backcountry user should know.

And it's not all theory–this same skillset allowed a TGR film crew to save a injured snowmobiler's life in Cooke City, Montana, and get Ian McIntosh to safety and medical after breaking his femur during a film shoot in Alaska in 2011. Get learned, be safe, and be the person that saves a life this winter!

Just remember–this podcast is intended to be educational but is not a replacement for the practical and real-world education and experience gained during an actual full-length wilderness first aid course; research to see what's available in your local area as far as courses go before the season gets underway!

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Checking In with Former Grom Comp Winner Parkin Costain
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Checking In with Former Grom Comp Winner Parkin Costain

Checking In with Former Grom Comp Winner Parkin Costain

While most 16-year-olds were up to God know’s what last summer, Parkin Costain, the winner of TGR’s 2015 Grom Comp, was nine-to-fiveing for his dad, who builds bike parks at ski areas. He needed to come up with the money for something that would help develop him into a pro skier. That something: a snowmobile. Enter the 2017 TGR Grom Contest Parkin pounds the backcountry on his snowmobile probably more than you brush your teeth. He’s homeschooled (but not weird), and invests his time

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The Ski Utah Wild Women of the Wasatch find happiness in the moments of synergy between the earth, our bodies and minds, that face shot of powder floating light as a bird across the snow. The deep belly laughs bubbling out when our girlfriend cracks a joke at the goofy outfit we put on, just because. It’s the chill that runs up our spine when the mountain breeze meets the sweat from hiking up the peak. It’s that sweet, sweet rush of pointing ‘em straight down the mountain, and when it comes

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Professional snowboarder Megan Pischke was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer in 2012. Paul Watt photo via the Chasing Sunshine documentary.  Something was just —on a deep physiological and energetic level. It wasn’t connected to paranoia or fear, and professional snowboarder Megan Pischke had every reason to trust the foundation of her body. She was the powerhouse athlete who could dominate big mountain lines in Alaska comps, stop at the bottom to breastfeed and then head back up for the