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Columbia Presents T-Bar Film’s “Vasu Sojitra Out On A Limb”

Vasu Sojitra does something few people can do, ski the backcountry with one leg. He lost his right leg to a blood infection at 9 months old. But rather than letting his disability define him,Vasu has always treated his amputation as a mere hiccup in life. Columbia presents T-Bar Film's "Out on a Limb", a film that profiles Vasu's inspiring story and follows him as he ventures deeper into the backcountry to summit peaks, drop into avalanche zones, send cliffs, and ski deep powder lines–all completely unassisted.This film gained international recognition as a finalist in the Banff Mountain Film Festival and as winner of the Winter Wildlands Backcountry Film Festival. Teton Gravity Research is proud to be exclusively premiering "Out On A Limb" today on our website.


Go behind the scenes of "Out On A Limb" with an exclusive interview with Vasu Sojitra & director Tyler Wilkinson-Ray.

Learn more about Vasu, enjoy a recap of his recent submit of the Grand Teton, the first by an adaptive athlete with crutches. 

Check out the original trailer to "Out On A Limb" presented by Columbia.

Interested in learning more about T-Bar Films? Be sure to check out their first film "United We Ski".

Like the gear Vasu is rocking! Get your all the gear you need from Columbia for the fast approaching winter!

This guy is a badass!

Wow! The VT footage is insane

Flippin’ A. Having suffered a spinal cord injury, and come back to skiing, and being pretty happy with the level I’ve been able to get to, it’s mind-blowing watching Vasu have the stamina and flow on bump lines and chutes like he does in this film. Respect.

    Seriously - the control and strength to flow through turns like that is super impressive. Hope to see more from Vasu!

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The Top 5 Aprés Ski Spots in Ski City
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I feel it is particularly suiting that I should write a piece on the aprés scene in my hometown of Salt Lake City. I’ve joked with many a person on the ski lift that the only reason I became a pro skier was to enjoy beers with friends after ski days. Whether or not that is 100% the truth or just 90%, I take my aprés extremely seriously, and know Ski City’s aprés options in and out. I am also passionate about Utah, and would like to dispel the incorrect rumor that Utah has a bad aprés

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It was opening day, and Shawn Florence was excited to get back out on the hill. The Windsor, Ontario native and his girlfriend, Tiffany Laporte, drove across the U.S. border to Clarkson, Michigan, to Pine Knob Ski and Snowboard Resort for the day. It started as a normal day on the hill, but it didn’t end that way.  “The day of my accident was not much different than any other day on the slopes,” Florence told TGR. “I had been doing runs all day without any issue. The only major

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Thompson Pass Pulls Down 52 Inches Of Powder In 24 Hours, Nearly Sets Record For Snowfall Rate
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Imagine waking up to 52 inches of powder in just 24 hours. According to measurements taken by the National Weather Service, that's exactly what happened at Thompson Pass, Alaska on Wednesday, where an astounding 83 inches of snow fell over three days, with 52 inches piling up during the final 24 hours of a massive storm front. While those numbers alone are staggering, perhaps the most mind-numbing statistic to consider is this: Per the SNOTEL gauges that sit 2,000 feet above pass level, at