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Dave Treadway Dies from Crevasse Fall in Pemberton B.C.

Editor's Note: A GoFundme has been established for the Treadway Family. To donate to the fund please scroll down and hit the link at the bottom of the story.

Professional freeskier Dave Treadway died yesterday after falling into a crevasse while backcountry skiing in Pemberton, British Columbia. The Pique News Magazine reports that the 34-year-old fell 98 feet into a crevasse after a snow bridge collapsed underneath him.

Pemberton District Search and Rescue (PSAR) arrived at the scene near Rhododendron Mountain to retrieve him, but Treadway had already succumbed to his injuries. The recovery was extensive and required 14 members of PSAR due to the depth of the crevasse.

Authorities have not officially released his name, but there's been an outpouring of grief on social media by the skier's friends confirming his passing. Treadway was a highly skilled big mountain skier—who was well-known for skiing impressive and aggressive lines. When he became a father to two boys, Treadway integrated his family into his adventures. The whole family spent time in the mountains, as seen in their shared Instagram "freerange.family". 

Treadway is survived by his wife and three children. We here at TGR want to extend our thoughts, and prayers to the friends and family of Treadway and will update this story as more information becomes available. 

UPDATE

A GoFundme has been established to support the Treadway family. To lend a hand to his wife and three children (ages six, two, and unborn), visit the fundraiser here.  

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