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Shaun White Wants to Skateboard in the 2020 Summer Olympics

During the 129th Session in Rio de Janeiro, the Olympic committee unanimously voted to include skateboarding - along with karate, baseball/softball, surfing, and sport climbing - in the Tokyo  2020 Summer Olympics. As a passion celebrated around the world, it's only appropriate that it's now an Olympic sport and will give more talented athletes the opportunity to compete in both summer and winter Olympics games.

One of those multi-talented athletes is Shaun White, one of the world’s most successful snowboarders. And he already has hopes to compete in the 2020 Summer Olympics in skateboarding.

Although he is a world-class snowboarder with a plethora of accolades, White actually entered the world of snowboarding through skateboarding. Originally hailing from San Diego, White was discovered by Tony Hawk in a local skatepark when he was seven years old, according to his biography

He competed in the Summer X Games from 2003-11, taking first place in the 2007 and 2011 Skateboarding Vert Final. He is also the first athlete to take home a gold medal from both the Summer and Winter X Games.

After his halfpipe win at the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics, White expressed his interest in competing in the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympics.

“Man, it’s wild. I assumed at some point in my lifetime, skateboarding would get into the Olympics,” White said in an interview with the Washington Post. “I’m just happy that it’s come at a time when I feel physically and mentally capable of actually competing and pursuing that goal and dream.”

Yes, thank goodness in 2020, skateboarding is going to be an Olympic sport, it was time for the sports authorities to decide that, so that our sport will be seen better, more widespread, and we will all win, they will stop seeing us as bad guys, I leave you a link to a website I saw about skateboarding, I like it a lot is in Spanish, but I’m sure you like it already tell me. Chao https://todoskate.online

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