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Snowmobiler Dies in Second Teton-Area Avalanche in 3 Days

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The tragic loss of Rob Kincaid, who died in an avalanche on Friday along the Wyoming/Idaho border, is being felt far and wide across the backcountry world. Though he was well known for his athleticism, genuine personality, and love of life, we knew him as a staunch advocate for backcountry safety. He graciously helped us spread the word to the snowmachine community about the importance of being prepared and avalanche aware. This portrait was taken in January 2019 at the TCSAR hangar as part of our "Dress for Success" outreach for @backcountryzero. Rob's death is a heartbreaking reminder that even the most experienced and professional riders can have accidents. He was the second highly experienced person to have died in an avalanche last week in our area with a beacon that appears to have not been turned on. We share this information not to cast shame on the victims but as an important reminder to please make sure you and your partners go through your safety checks. We offer our most sincere condolences to Rob’s family and friends, and to the community that loved him so much. He will be missed.

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This past week was a rough one for the local snowsports community around the Tetons. Just two days after a snowboarder died in an avalanche on Teton Pass, a snowmobiler was caught and killed in an avalanche in the Snake River Range on Friday, just a few miles south. The snowmobiler was identified as Rob Kincaid, a professional snowmobiler who frequented events like the Snow King Hill Climb and was a much-loved fixture on the local sled scene. The snowboarder killed on Teton Pass was identified as Trace Carrillo, also a friend and member of our local community.

RELATED: OP-ED Now Is Not the Time to "Try" Backcountry Skiing

According to the Bridger-Teton Avalanche Center, both victims were experienced backcountry users who were wearing avalanche beacons that were switched off at the time of the accident. During the ongoing COVID-19 epidemic, it is imperative to keep it mellow in the backcountry and take all necessary precautions to stay safe. BTAC reminds all of us to do a full beacon check each and every time we head out.

For more information on avalanche beacons and other safety skills, check out TGR’s Safety Week.

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