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Vail Snowboard Instructor Dies in Backcountry Outside Resort

The two skiers had reportedly become separated in backcountry on Monday, and Samuel Failla's body was found the next morning Travis Wise /Flickr

On Tuesday the body of 24-year-old Samuel Failla of New Jersey was recovered from the backcountry just east of Vail Ski Resort, according to  Fox13. Per Westword, Failla was working as a snowboard instructor at Vail this season.

Failla's body was found the day after another unidentified skier–who Fox13 reports was Failla's backcountry partner–was rescued Monday. Through the combined efforts of Vail Mountain Rescue Group and the Vail Ski Patrol, a rescue was conducted after authorities received a 911 call from the unidentified skier around 7 p.m. on Monday. 

After falling from the trail, the unidentified skier called for help after numerous hours attempting to hike out. At some point in the incident, Failla was separated from him. 

When rescued, the lost partner failed to tell authorities that he had been accompanied by Failla, instead waiting until the Tuesday morning to alert authorities. The rescued skier told police he originally assumed that Failla had safely exited the backcountry, and that he reported Failla missing Tuesday morning when he found out that wasn't the case. Rescuers found Failla's body on Tuesday morning near where they rescued the yet to be named skier.

Failla's cause of death has yet to be released. 

It boggles the mind that the rescued skier did not mention the other guy when he was rescued. That he “assumed” he made it out is the lamest, dumbest excuse I have ever heard.

Blows me away, this other skier didn’t report to authorities re his partner. Never assume, it makes an ass out of me and you too. Tragic accidents happened when common sense does not come thru one’s thought process. Will be praying for deceased skier, his family and friends. Also asking forgiveness for the guy whi live. It’s going to haunt him for the rest of his life unless he finds Jesus and ask for forgiveness.

Hey Vail,
Pro Tip:
Don’t hire instructors from New Jersey

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