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NASA Photos FINALLY Show Healthy Sierra Snowpack

After several years of drought and low snow levels throughout the state, California’s Sierra Nevada have finally made a triumphant return to winter. Let’s look at the numbers. According to NASA, Mammoth Mountain received 11 feet of snow in February, and has reported upwards of 37 feet so far this season. Currently, their snow water equivalent sits at 146 percent of normal, compared to 21 percent of normal this time last year. That's a LOT of snow.

RELATED: Celebrating the Sierra Snowmaggedon at Squaw Valley

Big storms have been walloping the Sierra since January, courtesy of our favorite weather term – atmospheric rivers. That’s when massive amounts of moisture are pumped from the Pacific on to land through narrow low-level plumes that bury mountain towns and ski areas across the West. Great news for skiers and snowboarders, but the far-reaching consequences are equally beneficial to anyone who relies on a steady water supply.

Nasa’s report sums it up: “The condition of Sierra Nevada snowpack has consequences that go well beyond ski season. Spring and summer melt from the Sierra Nevada plays a crucial role in recharging California’s reservoirs. Though conditions could change, California drought watchers are cautiously optimistic that the boost to the snowpack will insulate the state from drought this summer.”

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Squaw Valley Is Considering Renaming To Remove Racial Slur
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Squaw Valley Is Considering Renaming To Remove Racial Slur

Squaw Valley Is Considering Renaming To Remove Racial Slur

Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows announced they are considering a name change. TGR photo. California’s Squaw Valley Resort announced it is considering renaming to delete the racist and sexist slur “Squaw” from its name, following the nationwide movement to remove symbols of racism and indigenous oppression. The Tahoe-area resort says it plans to enlist the help of local tribal leaders in ultimately making a decision on the matter. In a statement, the resort said, “As you likely know, the term

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72-Year-Old Woman Tried to Photograph Yellowstone Bison, Gets Gored
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72-Year-Old Woman Tried to Photograph Yellowstone Bison, Gets Gored

72-Year-Old Woman Tried to Photograph Yellowstone Bison, Gets Gored

The bison charged the woman as she was trying to take a photo of it. Wikipedia photo. A woman was gored at Yellowstone National Park when she tried approaching a bison for a photo. Last Thursday, the 72-year-old woman was within 10 feet of the animal multiple times before it charged at her, goring her with its horns. The victim was flown to Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center for further treatment for her sustained puncture wounds. In response the to incident, park biologists

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New COVID-19 Drug Has Long Been Used in High Altitude Climbing
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New COVID-19 Drug Has Long Been Used in High Altitude Climbing

New COVID-19 Drug Has Long Been Used in High Altitude Climbing

A drug commonly used by high-altitude mountaineers and guides has shown promise as a treatment for Covid-19. Wikipedia photo. In recent weeks, news of a promising new treatment for COVID-19 has been making the rounds in medical circles and even made it to the front page of the New York Times. No, it's not a malaria drug. It’s a corticosteroid called dexamethasone, and it has long been used both as emergency medicine and as a sort of performance enhancing drug by high altitude climbers.