Sign In:

×

Last Step!

Please enter your public display name and a secure password.

Plan to post in the forums? Change your default forum handle here!

×
×

Skier Dies While Riding Closed Section of Mt. Rose

Looking up at the debris field. Andrew Pinkham photo. 

A man died in an avalanche this weekend while skiing in a closed off area at Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe in Reno, Nevada. Search crews recovered the body of the unidentified male before 1 p.m. on Sunday, the Washoe Country Sheriff's Office tweeted. It's believed to be the body of a 60-year-old skier who went missing Saturday morning. 

On Sunday, a rescue crew found the man's body in the debris of an avalanche that he and his partner had triggered while skiing in an area closed to the public due to high avalanche danger. The man did not have any avalanche safety gear on him. 

From the Mt. Rose Avalanche Report:

Two skiers hiked/traversed into CLOSED uncontrolled terrain at Mt. Rose. This terrain had NOT BEEN OPENED, HAD NOT BEEN SKIED, and HAD NOT BEEN CONTROLLED this winter. It is more analogous to a backcountry snowpack. They decided to drop into a steep wind-loaded slope. The first skier triggered a large avalanche that swept him downslope and buried him 600-1000 ft. below in debris that averaged 5 ft deep and reached up to 10 ft. deep in some areas. The second skier immediately called 911 and the search for his partner continued for the rest of the day. 

We at TGR are very sad to see this news. 

We strongly encourage everyone to follow closed signs while skiing. If you do decide to travel in the backcountry, please make sure that it is with proper training and equipment. Ski safe out there. 

Read more info on the details of the avalanche and a technical discussion here

Play
READ THE STORY
Whisper Ridge is First Resort in U.S. to Offer Heli-Biking
Up Next Bike

Whisper Ridge is First Resort in U.S. to Offer Heli-Biking

Whisper Ridge is First Resort in U.S. to Offer Heli-Biking

Heli-biking has become all the rage in the bike community, and thanks to Whisper Ridge in Utah, the trend has made its way to the U.S. The resort, just outside of Salt Lake City, is better known for its 70,000 acres of backcountry terrain. Now they’re upping their game by incorporating that same land for mountain biking. Their ultimate goal is to become North America’s premier heli-biking outfitter. RELATED: Nine Days Bikepacking Through Remote BC Backcountry This summer, they’ll be offering

Play
READ THE STORY
The RMNP Outhouse is the Coolest Place to Poo in the Backcountry
Up Next Ski

The RMNP Outhouse is the Coolest Place to Poo in the Backcountry

The RMNP Outhouse is the Coolest Place to Poo in the Backcountry

Beautiful and functional—what more could you want from an outhouse. AIA Photo.   Rocky Mountain National Park’s new outhouses are the shit. Seriously, they're such a big deal that they were awarded The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Small Project Award. According to the AIA, the park’s new outhouses stemmed from a special collaboration between the NPS and ColoradoBuildingWorkshop, which is part of CU Denver’s design-build program. Together they created the shiny new Longs Peak

Play
READ THE STORY
10-Year-Old Becomes Youngest to Climb El Cap’s Nose
Up Next Rock climb

10-Year-Old Becomes Youngest to Climb El Cap’s Nose

10-Year-Old Becomes Youngest to Climb El Cap’s Nose

Kids these days. They’ll do anything, like climb El Capitan. On June 12, 10-year-old Selah Schneiter became the youngest person to ascend the valley’s historic route. Following in the footsteps of Lynn Hill, the wee climber—who measures 4’2”—topped out on the route at 5:45 p.m. and was joined by her father Mike and his friend Mark. All in all, it took their group five days. At times she admitted to being scared but overall found the experience enjoyable. And when she found herself becoming