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​Losing Ski Resorts is a Financial Loss for Everyone

Empty chairlifts hurt more than just the ski resorts. Wallpaper stock photo.

Imagine if a manufacturing plant in a small community suddenly closed its doors. A majority of the local workforce would be without jobs and the economy would take a nosedive. This situation is currently unfolding in mountain towns throughout the U.S. Last week, nearly all the ski resorts in the country were forced to close because of the coronavirus pandemic. It was a decision that needed to happen for the well-being of thousands, but it will have its repercussions.

RELATED: PSA - Mountain Towns are NOT Safe Havens During COVID-19

Ski resorts bring a value to our local and national economies, and the numbers speak for themselves. In a 2016 study examining expenditures on ski and snowmobile industries, researchers found that snow-related work supported 191,000 jobs, provided $6.9 billion in wages, and dumped $11.3 billion into the overall economy. That value has only increased in 2020, with Bloomberg estimating that skiing now brings about $55 billion to the nation’s economy. That’s a lot of dough, and it’s not just going to ski resorts. This money trickles into all parts of a mountain town’s community: hotels, resorts, restaurants, bars, grocery stores, gear shops, gas stations, and heck, even the local hospitals.

So what does this mean in the wake of the current COVID-19 pandemic? Well, for one, 122 ski resorts still have to pay their annual leasing fees, which are about $50-million. Given that they’re currently generating no revenue, this may be difficult. Smaller mom and pop resorts could go under or be bought up by larger resort conglomerates. 

Recognizing the billions of dollars that the ski industry brings to Colorado and the nation has prompted Senator Cory Gardner to plead to the United States Department of Agriculture to waive National Forest land fees. In his letter to Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, he writes “historically, the month of March is the industry’s second-highest in revenue generation. Colorado Ski Country USA estimates that the 470 areas in the U.S. will suffer an economic loss of over $2 billion due to COVID-19.”

The USDA has yet to respond to Gardner’s request, but in the meantime here are a few things you can do to help your favorite mountain community:

Write to your state senator

If your favorite resort currently leases land from the national forest, send a letter or call to your senator to urge the USDA to waive leasing fees for the year. It’s a great way to kill time while being stuck at home.

Donate to your Favorite Mountain Town’s Foodbank

Can’t visit your favorite mountain town because you’re on lockdown? Send some love by donating the money you’d spend on gas or travel to a local foodbank. A lot of people are without jobs right now, so let’s make sure no one is going to bed hungry. Here are a few we were able to quickly find:

TRUCKEE, CA : https://sierracommunityhouse.org/

LAKE TAHOE, CA: http://foodbankedc.org/

JACKSON, WY: http://goodsamaritanmission.us/ OR https://www.jacksoncupboard.org/

STEVENS PASS, WA: https://uvmend.org/community-cupboard/support-cupboard

Support brick and mortar gear shops

Need to update a few pieces of gear? When this pandemic calms down, rather than buy online take that money and support your favorite small businesses, they'll be taking a big hit by being closed right now.

Thank For update BSEB Board 10th Result Always

It is true. Nearly all the ski resorts in the country were forced to close because of the coronavirus pandemic. Not only the ski resorts but most of the business is closed or stuck due to this pandemic, which is a pretty bad loss to them.  O2 Repeater

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