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Gunman Opens Fire at Climbers in Little Cottonwood

Wikimedia Commons photos.

SALT LAKE CITY — A gunman opened fire Monday evening at climbers mid-route in The Wasatch Range's Little Cottonwood Canyon. No injuries were reported, and law enforcement officials are curently investigating the incident. 

According to the Salt Lake Tribune and other anonymous sources, the shooting occurred at roughly 6 p.m. Monday in the area more commonly known for world-class powder skiing at nearby Snowbird and Alta ski areas.

Rock climber Samuel Clairmont and two others were rappelling the fourth pitch of Pentapitch when a green sedan opened fire on the exposed individuals from Little Cottonwood's Vaults Road before speeding away and evading pursuit.

Clairmont later posted a warning to fellow climbers on Mountaibuzz to "be aware of your surroundings and keep your eyes open."

5-7 whistled past us and hit rock around us.

"Warning to all climbers in SLC area," the post reads. "Today, me and 2 friends were on the upper ledge (rapping 4th pitch) of Pentapitch when multiple rounds were fired at us from a green sedan on the side of the vaults road, near gate B. Of the 15 Shots, ~5-7 whistled past us and hit rock around us. The other shots were fired and nearly hit climbers on Stifflers Mom.

Responding policeman Lt. Brian Lohrke said that the shooter(s) were able to escape before law enforcement arrived and that it's currently uncertain whether the shots were meant to wound or simply scare the roped-up climbers. 

“One witness stated a green passenger car with approximately three occupants could have been involved,” Lohrke told the Tribune. “The vehicle left the canyon before officers arrived.”

The shooting is still under investigation and if you have any information regarding the incident, please contact Utah police at 801-743-7000. 

why do people have to be so bloody terrible?

I find it very normal   http://moviesonline.ac/watch/ox1yj4xN-ray-donovan-season-5.html

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