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Catastrophic Oil Spill Wreaks Havoc on Mauritius’ Coastline

Two weeks ago a Japanese cargo ship hit a reef off the coastline of Mauritius and subsequently leaked 1,000 metric tons of oil into the island’s delicate marine ecosystem. Right now this spill has released more oil than the combined total of every oil tanker spill of 2019. Unfortunately, things are expected to get much worse. The crack in the hull’s ship—the original culprit for the spill—is expected to worsen and release the remaining 1,800 metric tons of fuel, oil, and diesel on board. 

SUPPORT: Donate to the Mauritius coastal cleanup fund

Mauritius has declared a state of emergency in response to the disaster, and local volunteers are frantically trying to clean up the mess. Residents have resorted to making makeshift oil booms with sugar cane leaves, plastic bottles, and donated human hair to try to absorb the toxic oil from the water. France is also sending equipment to help with the cleanup efforts. The island nation east of Madagascar is a treasure trove of rare plants and animals, like the pink pigeon and the blue-tailed gecko, that can’t be found anywhere else in the world. Mauritians fear that the damage will not only be devastating for the environment, but also for the nation’s well-being. The coronavirus pandemic has already wreaked havoc on its tourism-based economy and this growing disaster could further exacerbate the current health and economic crisis facing the small nation.

If you'd like to lend a hand, Eco-Sud—a local NGO—is collecting funds that will directly benefit the cleanup and protection of Mauritius’ coastline. Click here for more information.

It’s not a good news you have said. It’s about a thousand metric tons that leaked into the marine ecosystem of Mauritius. That means its a large environmental pollution. flats in kadavanthra This will not be good for the Marine ecosystem as well as the people who are living in that Island.

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