Sign In:

×

Last Step!

Please enter your public display name and a secure password.

Plan to post in the forums? Change your default forum handle here!

×
×

Avalanche Incident from Banff National Park Turns Fatal

Editor's Note: TGR understands the inherent risks with skiing and snowboarding and urges anyone going out to have the proper knowledge, equipment, a partner, and a plan. For more information on how to stay safe while enjoying winter sports, check out TGR’s annual Safety Week series.

Left: It was a 2.5 sized avalanche. Right: A close up of the crown. Avalanche Canada Photo

A skier in Canada passed away in hospital care after being rescued from an avalanche event in Banff National Park. Last Friday, January 10th, a 32-year-old woman was backcountry skiing with two other skiers on the south-facing slope of Mount Hector when an 80m (262ft) wide slab was triggered. Mount Hector is just north of Lake Louise.

According to CBC, the slide was speculated to have been remotely triggered by her party. The crown varied from two meters (6.5ft) of wind loaded snow to as little as 40cm (15in) of snow. Once released, the slab traveled 550m (1804ft) down the slope and caught the 32-year-old skier, burying her in dense amounts of debris. It took 45 minutes for her group to dig her out. Once freed from the snow she was airlifted to a hospital, where she remained in critical condition. The next day she succumbed to her injuries and died.

RELATED: For more information on how to stay safe while enjoying winter sports, check out TGR’s annual Safety Week series.

Following the incident, Avalanche Canada found that the slide ran on a weak layer of facets and depth hoar that was located right at the base of the snowpack. In some spots, the avalanche even exposed the ground and trees underneath the snowpack.

Another view of the slide path on Mount Hector. Avalanche Canada Photo.

Parks Canada urges visitors to check terrain conditions and be aware of the avalanche danger before heading out into the backcountry. Like many snowpacks throughout the west, the British Columbian snowpack has complex problems and are likely to persist for an extended period of time. For avalanche information in Canada, be sure to check out Avalanche Canada.

<a ><h1>Enjoy a great time with beautiful ebony girls in Malindi</h1></a>

Play
READ THE STORY
Vail CEO Rob Katz Pens Open Letter About Next Ski Season
Up Next News

Vail CEO Rob Katz Pens Open Letter About Next Ski Season

Vail CEO Rob Katz Pens Open Letter About Next Ski Season

Vail CEO Rob Katz wrote a letter with a message for the upcoming ski season. Flickr photo. Back in March, Vail and other large ski industry corporations were faced with the tough decision of closing their resorts – essentially killing off their main revenue streams – in response to the growing COVID-19 pandemic. At this point, it’s unfortunately become clear that we’re all in it for the long haul, and many ski resorts have been asking themselves existential questions about the upcoming

Play
READ THE STORY
These Eco-friendly Alternatives to Plastic are Something to Celebrate About
Up Next News

These Eco-friendly Alternatives to Plastic are Something to Celebrate About

These Eco-friendly Alternatives to Plastic are Something to Celebrate About

All it takes is one quick trip to the grocery store to see that we consume an absurd amount of single-use plastic. Your toothpaste tube is plastic. The pasta you bought for dinner is packaged in plastic. Your favorite granola bars come in—you’ve probably guessed already—plastic. If you don’t want to hear any more depressing news reports about dead whales full of plastic, then we’ve got to do more than recycling our water bottles and hummus containers. We need to find an alternative for all

Play
READ THE STORY
Pledge to Vote this November with Protect Our Winters
Up Next News

Pledge to Vote this November with Protect Our Winters

Pledge to Vote this November with Protect Our Winters

POW wants to see which outdoor community can pledge the most voters. Will it be skiers, snowboarders, trail runners, or climbers? POW photo, Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you know that a BIG election is coming this November. Considering that the outdoor community is comprised of 50 million eligible voters, Protect Our Winters wants to make sure that everyone heads to the polls to make their voices heard. Step one simply means pledging to vote, however, to make things a bit more