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What Gear You Will Need For Your Next Adventure

Since camping is a personalized experience, every outdoor adventurer should prepare based on their desires, needs, strengths, and weaknesses. If you are the type of camper who likes to be gone a lot for an extended period of time, you might consider installing an outdoor camera at your home to keep it safe so you can enjoy your time away. You will also need to consider what supplies you will need to keep yourself safe wherever you are camping.

There are many things that every camper needs on their trip. There are also some necessities for your entire group that doesn't need to be carried by every individual. Here are six basic items to get you started on your outdoor adventure.

Sleeping Bag

You can't leave on your outdoor adventure without a sleeping bag. If you don't have a sleeping bag, then a camping blanket with a sleeping pad will do. This allows you to stay warm while sleeping in the outdoor elements and provides some cushion. While a sleeping pad isn't necessary if you're the type of person who can fall asleep anywhere.

You may prefer to use a tent, which will be explained later. But some people prefer to sleep in a bivvy-style bag, which can protect you from the elements. These are not ideal for most campers, but they provide additional warmth in some of the worst conditions. The great thing about these bags is that they don't take up a lot of space and aren't as heavy as sleeping bags.

Flashlight

Every camper should have a flashlight in his or her arsenal. Flashlights are necessary for safety reasons and make nighttime activities more fun. Choose a small, lightweight flashlight that fits comfortably in your hands and throws off a great deal of light. Some campers prefer to wear a headlamp, but also pack a flashlight, as they come in a wide variety of lumens. Keep in mind that it can be difficult to wear a headlamp for an extended amount of time.

Tent

Tents are often shared by two people, but you can use one for yourself if you prefer. There are also larger tents that can accommodate large groups of people. This means that you'll need to bring enough tents that satisfy the size of your group. You'll have to get adjusted to your new sleeping arrangements for the next few days.

While it's not necessary for a single person to carry one tent, you can separate in pieces if you prefer. You can carry the rainfly and poles, while someone else carries the main tent shell.

Portable Stove

One of the best types of gear you can bring along on your camping trip is a camp stove or a portable stove. While you can cook on an open fire, it can lead to a forest fire. Campfires are banned in many locations, especially in the areas of the U.S. where wildfires are a threat. You'll have to bring along a camp stove or a portable stove wherever you go on your journey.

A two-burner camp stove is preferable for car or RV camping. This allows you to try various campground recipes without taking up space. On the other hand, a single burner backpacking stove is ideal for heating up soup or baked beans. Don't forget to bring along the fuel, which will take up more space than your stove.

If you're camping with a large group of people, you'll need one stove for every two people. This makes it easier to cook large amounts of food than one stove would.

Survival Kit

A survival kit should be in every camper's gear before an outdoor trip. It should contain all the things you need in order to survive. Some campers prefer to purchase survival kits while others like to make it themselves. While either method is fine, you want to make sure that you have everything that you need.

Your survival kit should also include a first aid kit. While you can pack as much as your space allows, the following items should be included:

Antacid

Antiseptic wipes

Aspirin

Band-aids and bandages

Benadryl

Gauze

Ibuprofen

Topical pain-relieving cream, gel, or lotion

Triple antibiotic ointment

Tweezers

You should also bring along any prescription medications, supplements, and vitamins you'll need for the duration of your trip. Keep your first aid kit and survival kit in a resealable bag or a canvas bag that keeps everything organized. Use a brightly colored bag for each kit, so they're easy to identify. 

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