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The Necessities to Every Camping Trip

As the temperatures start to rise, you are probably starting to think about your summer plans. There's nothing quite like camping; whether you choose to sleep in your RV or rest under the stars the old-fashioned way, camping is a pastime that anyone can enjoy. No matter where you are going camping, there are a few things you need to take with you to ensure a pleasant and safe trip.

Camping Necessities 101: Everything You Need to Survive and Thrive

Whether it's your first time heading out into the wilderness or you just need a helpful checklist, take a look at this list, so you don't leave anything behind! You are going to be away from most of your daily conveniences; forgetting any of these items could cause a disruption or issue during your camping trip. Your list may be longer if you are bringing children or pets, so be sure to include all of their essentials too.

1. The Basics

Don't leave home without the basic necessities. Items like your tent, camping chairs, sleeping bags and pads, pillows and blankets, lanterns and flashlights, and a first aid kit will all allow you to have a safe trip and be properly sheltered from the wilderness.

2. Health and Safety

Toilet paper, menstrual products, your toothbrush and toothpaste, shampoo, a hairbrush, any medications you take, pain medication, towels, soap, bug spray, and sunscreen should all be on your checklist. Staying healthy and clean is important, especially while you are camping to reduce the risk of injury and infection.

3. Tools

Be sure to bring a multi-tool or Swiss Army knife, some tape, a rope, a hammer, and a tent repair kit so you can easily set up camp and be prepared to fix things if they break. This is just a short list of commonly used tools, but you can bring your entire toolbox if you'd like. It's better to be safe than sorry; try to keep your tools organized for easy access.

4. Food Preparation

Food is one of the best parts of camping; everything tastes better when it's cooked over an open fire. Be sure to bring firewood, kindling, fire starter, lighter fluid, pots and pans, mugs, cups, plates, utensils, can opener, dish cleaning supplies, a cooler, trash bags, a griddle, a coffee percolator, marshmallow skewers, and food storage containers for leftovers. Also, make a list of your favorite foods and be sure to plan out meals before hitting the grocery store. You may want to chop your vegetables at home to save time at the campsite.

5. Clothing

Underwear and socks, old t-shirts, jeans, shorts, thermal underwear, a jacket, several pairs of footwear; water shoes, boots, and sandals, and pajamas shouldn't be forgotten. You should pack clothing for all types of temperatures and weather conditions. Having the proper clothing on hand means you will be prepared for whatever mother nature decides to bring on your camping trip.

Loading Up and Getting There

While loading your vehicle with all these supplies can be a daunting task, it can be made easier by using the proper packing strategies. Camping supplies can be heavy and leave little room for passengers to ride comfortably on the way to the campsite, so you may want to consider taking a 2019 Ford Explorer on your trip.

Depending on how long you will be gone and where you are camping, you may be able to omit some of these items from the list. If you prefer minimalistic camping, you can omit some of these items. Some campsites may provide some of these items; be sure to check ahead of time. If there is a camp store on the grounds, you may be able to purchase some of your items there. Always be sure to pack the essentials; you should never go camping without a first aid kit, the proper clothing, and ample food supply. Happy camping!

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