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Phantom Snow Introduces First Dedicated Hardboot Splitboard Boot

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We are thrilled to announce that we are releasing our split tech boot for the upcoming 20-21 season , The Slipper . We’ve been prototyping for years and now that we have created our ideal boot , we are really excited to share it with the splitboarding world . We have created a boot that combines the benefits of a lightweight A/T boot with the comfort and riding performance of a snowboard boot . Some key details about The Slipper ; Link lever included. Fully Heat moldable Memoryfit Shell Platinum Light liner Automatic crampon compatible Target weight of 1000g (size27) MSRP $799.95 USD Shipping late November. ! Available in sizes 26-29 ********* Email us at info@phantomsnow.com to get the most up to date information on the Slipper and the details of the upcoming preorder . *Prototype boot shown in photo .

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Okay, this might fall on deaf ears for many of you, but for practitioners of the dark art of snowboard mountaineering, this is big news. Phantom Snow Industries – the brand behind the amazing splitboard binding that lets you use a hardboot setup – just announced their first dedicated hardboot for snowboarding. It’s called the Slipper, and it’s a refined version of the Atomic Backland Ultimate boot they have been helping customers modify to use with their binding systems.

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What are the benefits of a hardboot? Well, they might not be quite as comfortable as a standard snowboard boot, but for long missions that mostly involve climbing and skinning, the efficiency of using an ultralight ski boot and tech binding system can’t be beat. With this combo, you're not lugging the weight of your binding with every step. Over the last few seasons, dedicated splitboard mountaineers have been busy modifying AT boots to suit their needs. While the Slipper might not be the answer to all their needs, it’s certainly a strong signal that this particular part of the industry is taking off and we’re stoked to see where it goes.

The Slipper will be available in sizes 26-29 next season for an MSRP of $800. It weighs in at 1000g for a size 27, and features a heat-moldable Memoryfit Shell, a moldable liner, and compatibility with automatic crampons.

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