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Items to Put on Your Checklist for Your Next Hike

Summertime is the perfect season to enjoy a trek through the wilderness. Preparation is a crucial detail of a successful hike, and if you get lost or hurt on the trail, you’ll have to rely on your essential supplies to get you back to safety. Whether you plan a brief day hike or a long trip, you should carry the following crucial items to ensure your safety and well-being.

Food and Water

When you plan to hit the trail, your primary concern should be to stay adequately hydrated for your adventure. Food and water are your main concern, and you should pack more than you think you need. It’s best to hike in a group, but if you’re walking alone, you have to prepare for the possibility of getting lost. One water bottle and an energy bar may seem suitable for a day hike, but if there’s an accident, you’ll be glad that you brought additional water and food. Add extra water and food onto your original estimate for supplies, and for a healthy boost of nutrition, you can mix Tony Horton supplements with your water.

First-Aid Kit

The hiking trails around the world offer an incredible view of natural environments, but they can also lead to cuts, blisters or more severe injuries. A well-stocked first-aid kit is another essential item that you need on every hiking trip. Some of the inexpensive kits only contain a minimum of supplies, and when you’re shopping for first aid, avoid buying the cheapest products. Blisters from new boots are the most common type of injury on the trail, and you can pack moleskin (available in larger kits) to treat blisters. Other items that you should bring kit include alcohol wipes, sanitizer, emergency blanket, signal mirror and tourniquet cord.

Maps and GPS

Before leaving on your trip, don’t forget to pack your trail maps and navigation tools. Getting lost is not a unique occurrence on the trails, and you should become confident with map reading and GPS navigation before attempting a lengthy hike. Most cell phones include compass apps, but don’t expect to have service (for calls) while you’re hiking in the mountains. Learning the basics of map navigation is incredibly important when you venture out alone, and you can’t always count on a phone to lead you out of the woods.

Rain Gear

Although it’s not advisable to bring an umbrella for your hiking trip, you should grab a poncho or raincoat. Narrow trails with overhanging tree limbs are not ideal for umbrellas, and you probably don’t want to hold an umbrella for several hours on a slick path. Storms can develop quickly in the mountains, and your hike will become miserable if you’re unprepared in the rain. For the summer, the ideal raincoat should be lightweight and easy to store. Several companies offer collapsible rain gear that folds down to a wallet-sized pouch.

Pocketknife

Another important item that you shouldn’t leave behind is a pocketknife. A large bowie knife or machete is unnecessary for most hikes because most traits are cleared and maintained. Choose a folding pocketknife that is exceptionally sharp and easy to carry. Knives are useful for everyday tasks like cutting rope or cords, and they can be invaluable when you need to cut clothing during an emergency.

Sunscreen and Sunglasses

When you’re hiking in higher elevations, the air is thinner and feels colder, and it’s easy to forget about sun protection. The sun is more intense and closer to your body at high altitude, and it doesn’t take long to get sunburned. Use a sunblock with at least 20 spf and bring a pair of polarized sunglasses. The trees will temporarily provide shade in dense forests, but you’ll likely encounter sections of the trail that are barren or sparsely populated with vegetation.

Hiking is an excellent activity for the end of the summer, and it’s the perfect time to visit sites that will be covered by snow in the upcoming months. As long as you come prepared for the hike, you can focus solely on the scenic beauty of the landscape.

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