Sign In:

×

Last Step!

Please enter your public display name and a secure password.

Plan to post in the forums? Change your default forum handle here!

×
×

A Beginners Guide To Fly Fishing

If you have ever thought about taking up fly fishing – but are unsure where to start – then this guide is for you. There’s little doubt that, as a hobby, fly fishing is one of the most serene and peaceful things you can do. However, some clarity on what you need to begin your fly fishing journey is required.

What Exactly Is Fly Fishing?

First, let’s get a few things sorted out starting with an explanation as to what fly fishing is all about. Basically, the main difference with this type of fishing is the fly itself. This is generally quite lightweight with a small hook with a synthetic material and a few feathers. To you, it might not look much, but to a fish it looks like food.

As with any kind of fishing, you should always check to see if you require a permit for where you plan to fish. Also, look for any other limitations. Remember, you may be on private property as well, so need to check that in advance.

Your Equipment

For equipment, all you need is a fly rod and reel, a selection of flies in a box. If you plan on going into the water then some waders would be a good idea. However, let’s begin with the rod.

There are three main areas to think about with the rod – the length, the weight, and the action.

1. The length.

The average rod will be around nine feet long. But then, if you are fishing in an area with a number of obstacles, then a shorter rod is best. On the other hand, fishing in the middle of a large lake can allow you to use a longer rod allowing for more distance on your casting.

2. The weight.

The weight is also important, and for people starting out you should use a mid-weight rod. They grade rods from two to seven where two is for small fish and seven is for fish such as salmon. In this instance, you should aim for around a five.

3. The action.

For the action, rods come in either slow, medium or fast. For beginners, the fast action makes it easier to cast over a longer distance even though the control aspect is harder.

Of course, the rod is only part of it as the reel is equally as important.

Getting The Correct Reel

It’s advisable to invest in a good reel, and I’d say you should push the boat out a bit. To get the correct one, look at your rod and it will tell you the line size it recommends is used with the rod. These two pieces need to match, so don’t try putting any random two items together.

For the line, get a floating one as this is highly recommend for those starting out. By doing so, it allows you to fly fish both on the surface of the water as well as with flies that sink.

Best Tips On Getting Started

Having the correct equipment is huge. You will need a good bowie knife to cut your line and perform other tasks. But that shouldn’t mean you jump into the water to get started. Instead, you must practice if you have never done this kind of thing before.

Learning how to cast isn’t easy. It takes quite a lot of practice. Even though you may get strange looks, do consider going into your garden to perfect the art. Poor casting on the water will lead to frustration and a decreased chance of your fishing trip being a success.

Next, do research as to the best spots. Experienced anglers know where to go to increase their chances, so follow their lead. Merely picking a spot and hoping for the best does mean you rely purely on luck. Learn the way in which fish tend to swim in channels and then identify them.

Finally, you should start off with a gentle stream until you really do perfect your casting technique and hopefully become more skilled at catching those fish. After several trips to the stream, think about working your way up to a larger river. Later, you may carry on to lakes and being out on a boat. Starting off on the bank of a river is advisable as long as you look out for any obstacles around or above you before you cast.

Getting started with fly fishing is not complicated. Remember, there’s a need to have the correct equipment from the outset. It doesn’t have to be as expensive as you fear, and even though it does take some time to get good at the techniques, it’s worth it in the end.

Fly fishing is a wonderfully relaxing way to spend the day. Being out in nature and allowing time to pass you by is great fun, but remember to have clothing for all types of weather in case things turn nasty.

Play
READ THE STORY
​6 Pieces of Invaluable Backcountry Technology
Up Next Ski

​6 Pieces of Invaluable Backcountry Technology

​6 Pieces of Invaluable Backcountry Technology

The topic of technology comes up again and again between backcountry travelers. Nowadays, with our daily lives revolving around computers and electronic devices, it is understandable that we wish to escape the pull of our devices when we are out in the mountains. However, certain pieces of technology are undeniably helpful to safe backcountry travel. Beacon/Shovel/Probe The holy trinity. It’s as simple as saying, DO NOT go into the backcountry without a working avalanche beacon, shovel, and

Play
READ THE STORY
Why Communication is Your Lifeline in the Backcountry
Up Next Gear & Tech

Why Communication is Your Lifeline in the Backcountry

Why Communication is Your Lifeline in the Backcountry

In the backcountry skiing and snowboard community we place so much energy on the gear that we own. We obsess over which skis to buy, outerwear to purchase, and the boots on our feet. This all has its place and proper gear should never be overlooked, but what is so often do is the importance of communication in the backcountry. TGR sat down with Exum mountain guide Zahan Billimoria to talk about this topic. What is communication So Important in the Backcountry?  Almost every other way of

Play
READ THE STORY
Dynafit’s Hoji Boot Just Got A Whole Lot Better
Up Next Gear & Tech

Dynafit’s Hoji Boot Just Got A Whole Lot Better

Dynafit’s Hoji Boot Just Got A Whole Lot Better

Remember last year, when Dynafit announced a revolutionary new ski touring boot designed by the ski boot mastermind Eric “Hoji” Hjorleifson himself? Well, that original production boot was a phenomenal start, but left something to be desired for the hardcore freeriders out there. Dynafit listened to us skiers and made a few changes. So there’s a new version coming out, but what’s been updated? Two words: Toe welt. RELATED: Safety Week - Introduction to Snow The original Hoji Pro Tour will