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Onsego: Reflecting on The GED High School Equivalency Diploma

Throughout the last few decades, household wealth in the United States has risen, reaching $150 trillion in 2021, for the first time ever. Yet, while the country has gotten richer, that wealth is not spread out equally. Educational attainment plays a huge part in determining a person’s future earnings. Quite simply, the higher your educational attainment, the higher your future earnings will be. As the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics put it in a recent report, “education pays”. That is why so many Americans have returned to school to complete their General Educational Development (GED) high school equivalency (HSE) diploma.

There are many reasons why people drop-out of high school. They range from mental health issues that make it difficult to continue learning, to economic hardships. Whatever the reason, dropping out closes off the most clear path to securing a decent income in adulthood. Thankfully, dropout rates have been falling, although they remain significant, at 5.1% in 2019.

Given the shift in American life, with the earnings gap between those with the highest educational attainment and those with the lowest, widening, the importance of returning back to high school and getting a GED HSE diploma, is getting stronger. People are not just doing it for a better income, in many cases, they have higher ambitions and want to get into college and maybe even graduate school, and fulfil a professional dream that they have.

However, as GED prep company, Onsego, points out, there are many jobs that a person can get without having a GED. This is important for those people who will need to support themselves as they pursue their GED HSE diploma. Onsego has found that many adults who are doing their GDE HSE diploma; a process which takes about 2 months, usually come in two forms: those who are working and studying, and those who are able to spend all their time studying. Being able to find work without a GED diploma is important because of the time constraints that many adults have in starting and completing their GED HSE diploma. A lot of GED programs are online, which makes it easier for people who want to get their GED. A lot of thought has been put into making it easier for people to resume their studies.

There can be prejudices about adult learning. The first comes from people who judge them for doing late in life what they should have done earlier in life. This is the wrong perception to have and adults who are returning to high school are often more focused, hard-working, and appreciative of the importance of education, than younger peers. In many ways, they are the ideal student. Secondly, there is a prejudice that adult learning is hard. Agaib, this is false. It’s important to have an open mind about your abilities, to have what educators call a “growth mindset”. In other words, instead of telling yourself that you are too old to learn, you should believe that because you are older, you can call upon more tools to learn, and can be a more efficient, faster and better learner than a younger student. Overcoming these prejudices and seeing your work in the right light, is key to not just completing your GED, but perhaps even making greater educational achievements.

For me this question was relevant in the past because this problem is not from today but from long ago, now as a college student I have to say that actually being smart is more important than being clever and educated; for this I used this source https://graduateway.com/essay-examples/observation/ to write a paper on the topic “Observation”, this was for me the first time but here I found a lot of interesting ideas, more than that, now I showed it to my teachers at the college where I study and now they with me to cook for the Olympiad that will take place soon, I don’t even know how to tell them that I did it independently and the exam won’t be so easy, but now I got the ideas I needed to understand about studying and everything related to the educational system.

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Morgan McGlashon Goes Further into the Guiding World for NEXUS
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Morgan McGlashon Goes Further into the Guiding World for NEXUS

Morgan McGlashon Goes Further into the Guiding World for NEXUS

To put it lightly, Morgan McGlashon’s days are busy. The 27 year old Exum Mountain Guide spends her summers guiding groups up and down the Grand Teton, something that most folks would deem to be a once in a lifetime experience. In the winter, she continues to work for Exum as a mountain guide, avalanche instructor, supporting marketing coordinator and more. Her ski mountaineering, climbing treks through high alpine and human powered adventures have taken her all around the world. At just 18

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8163-meter Manaslu has been the site of several high-profile climbing accidents in the last few weeks - do we need to rethink our approach to these mountains? | Wikimedia photo. The Himalayas are facing one of their deadliest years yet, and world-renowned sherpas are paying the price. This season alone has seen a considerable uptick in death on Manaslu – an 8163-meter peak that many used to call Everest’s bunny hill. As the earth warms and crowds worsen, climbing tourists and professional

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Women in the Mountains: How Burton Snowboarder Kimmy Fasani is Rebounding from Breast Cancer
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Last November, Burton snowboarder Kimmy Fasani was breastfeeding her second son when she noticed a pea-sized lump in her armpit. “Oh shit,” she thought. Both of Fasani’s parents had died of cancer and she’d set up her lifestyle to avoid any possibility of getting it herself. But, a day after finding the lump, she sat in her doctor’s office and listened to them clinically diagnose her with breast cancer. “Within three days, everything was flipped upside,” she says. Fasani, Truckee native,