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Meet the Women of Teton Gravity Research

Cinematographer Jill Garreffi enjoying an extra powdery day in the office. TGR Photo.

Unfortunately, action sports media has this perception of being a bro-fest. It’s a fair assumption, but it’s not always the reality. At least here at Teton Gravity Research our staff is almost 50/50. People are usually stunned to learn how last year’s film Winterland was completely edited by an all-women post-production team. Or hear about Jill Garreffi, one of TGR’s principal cinematographers, who’s spent the last 12 years filming skiing from Alaska to Japan. And then there’s Brittany Gibeau who keeps film productions afloat thanks to her talent as a producer. We could keep going, but you’re probably getting the point.

RELATED: It’s Time to Support More Women in Action Sports Photography

In celebration of International Women's Day, we wanted to take a moment and highlight the incredible women working behind the scenes at TGR. Our hope is that by learning more about each of these individuals it changes the perception of the action sports industry. The outdoors is for everyone, regardless of your gender, sexual orientation, or ethnicity. 

So, without further ado, meet the women of TGR. 

Brittany Gibeau - Producer

I produce TGR signature films with the majority of my work centered around our annual ski and snowboard film. I spend my time coordinating athletes and production crews, developing and putting segments into motion, ensuring that the content we need is being captured, and of course, putting out fires as they arise.

What do you love about working in the Outdoor industry?

I grew up in the mountains and my whole life has been heavily influenced by the outdoors. I never questioned my ability to work in the outdoor industry and am grateful that there are so many opportunities within the space. I also love what a small world it is and appreciate the sense of community that exists amongst all of us who have been brought together by our love for the outdoors, which is so much greater than the actual work that we do.

How can we encourage more women to work in action sports media?

While the world of action sports media is not the boys club it used to be, it’s still quite possible to find yourself the only female in a room full of men. As a working mom I certainly have different priorities and perspectives than some of the guys I work with, but having the confidence in what I bring to the table prevents me from even noticing it most days


Jill Garreffi - Cinematographer and Editor

When the snow is flying, I work as a cinematographer and story producer, and in the summers I’m editing the annual snow film. Last winter, I spent the season filming for the Lindsey Vonn documentary, which was amazing to see such a different side of skiing. Documenting the intimate ups and downs of a high-performance athlete’s life was such a special experience. This year’s annual ski and snowboard film will be my 12th annual film at TGR. I always look forward to exploring nocks and crannies of the world I haven’t been to, and love going back to Alaska and Eastern Europe.

What do you love about working in the Outdoor industry?

Working in the outdoors is heavily weather dependent, which creates a lot of havoc but it also keeps things exciting. The outdoors attracts a certain type of people. The people that I get to document, as well as work with, are rugged, sturdy people that like to have fun and enjoy being outside; these are my people. Between the humans and the elements, there’s never a dull moment, and it’s an unpredictable world we operate in. Whether your boat breaks down in the middle of an iceberg field or you’re scooching a van full gear down a snowy road without snow tires, there’s no shortage of shenanigans and amazing people to share it with. I love it!


Taylor Fry - Digital Content Coordinator

I coordinate daily digital content on our social media platforms and work with various teams to ensure marketing and distribution initiatives are delivered. Occasionally I get to write a story or two, but currently my biggest project includes improving my in-office Nerf gun skills.

What do you love about working in the Outdoor industry?

For me, the outdoors has always been a space for different kinds of growth. It’s always provided me with an escape, but on the flip side, it has an incredibly unique communal aspect to it. It has provided me with a certain type of solitude (one where you aren’t really ever alone). Working in the outdoor industry, you work with people that have this mutual understanding and drive to share their own outdoor experiences and passions with the rest of the world. What’s not to love about that?

How can we encourage more women to work in action sports media?

Encouraging not only women, but any marginalized group to work in action sports media is imperative for growth in this community. Having different perspectives encourages it to change and by welcoming unheard voices and experiences, it will enable the industry to be a more inclusive and welcoming environment, which is what the outdoors and sports are really about. I believe the first step in achieving this is to have a conversation about the lack of women and other marginalized groups in action sports and the outdoor industry. Changing those facts will provide more role models and create a space of equal opportunity in the action sports world.


Caleigh Smith - Editorial Intern

I assist the digital team with any short aggregate content that needs to be written, pitch and research my own stories, write lots of articles, and generally help out wherever I can!

What do you love about working in the Outdoor industry?

Have you ever been lucky enough to have a space where you just feel at home, surrounded by like-minded and interesting people who support your goals and dreams, while pursuing the passions that drive you? It's a pretty rosy feeling. That’s the outdoor industry for me. I enjoy the unending support of everyone I meet and the welcoming attitudes of strangers I meet on the skin track. The random cheers from people at the base of a wall. I enjoy reciprocating such support and adding to the community in any way I can. It's a global family and I constantly feel so grateful to be a part of it. I'm turning my passions into my job...who gets to be so lucky?

Who's inspired you in action sports media?

I've always been inspired by all the lady shredders in my favorite movies, magazines, and social media. I think exposure is key to recruiting new talent, and TGR does a wonderful job. Representation can only improve from here for ladies in action sports media!


Meg Matheson - Social & Sierra Nevada Ambassador Coordinator

I manage the Sierra Nevada Ambassador Program and help run TGR's Social channels. 

What do you love about working in the Outdoor industry?

Most people working in the Outdoor Industry are insanely passionate and like-minded. I love working in this field because of the relationships I've been able to build and the common ground we all stand on. Through this industry I've found life long friends and walk away feeling inspired each day.

Who's inspired you in action sports media?

Robin Van Gyn all day. She's a total powerhouse on a snowboard and fights for representation in the sport. There are so many talented, unstoppable women in action sports - both behind and in front of the lens. I think it all starts with pushing for more representation of women in action sports. When I see women crushing out there, it feels relatable and inspires me to get out there myself. It spurs that whole "If she can do it, maybe I can do it" mentality. 


Kyle Freudenberg - Post-Production Assistant

I organize and sync footage coming back from the field. I also prepare and sort footage for the editors—basically assisting in various day to day post-production activities.

What do you love about working in the Outdoor industry?

The content I get to watch gets me excited on my own backcountry endeavors, inspires me to push my limits athletically and keep learning new skills for life in the mountains. Also, the people I get to work with are pretty rad!

Who's inspired you?

Julie Zell (OG ripper who I aspire to be as cool as) and Elena Height.

How can we encourage more women to work in action sports media?

By being an inclusive community and sharing our outdoor wisdom. We all have something to teach and learn from each other when it comes to practicing good decision making and badassery in the mountains.


Charlotte Percle - Lead Snow Film Editor

I will be cutting this year’s snow film, basically every segment. My job involves picking the music, cutting each segment, coordinating with my supervisor about the overarching creative, and making sure that’s translated throughout the film. It doesn’t really feel like a job in that sense. I would be doing these things anyway, but now I’m getting paid to watch people ski—which is cool.

The whole journey with TGR has been way more exciting than I ever could’ve expected. I came to Jackson with no expectations to do a three-month internship and within the space of a year and a half, I’m now editing the ski movie. That’s something I never could have imagined. Looking back on this journey is a huge highlight.

What do you love about working in the Outdoor industry?

It’s the people who work in this industry. They’re the kind of people I want to spend time with. Generally, that makes the work environment a great place to connect with people, and everyone here at TGR is doing cool stuff on the weekends. Rather than head home and tune out.

Who's been a mentor for you?

Jill Garreffi has been huge, and she’s been at TGR for such a long time—12 years now. She knows everything inside and out about TGR and making films, to have her there and get to work alongside her has made this transition into this new role less stressful. 


Zoe Catalano - Post Production Supervisor

The post-production supervisor is in charge of overseeing the entire post-production process, from ingesting and organizing footage from the field to the final mastering of films and various digital projects. I work with producers and editors to ensure projects move smoothly from one stage to the next making sure deadlines are met.

What do you love about working in the Outdoor industry?

I love being able to combine my extracurricular interests with the kind of content we work with on a daily basis. Seeing athletes and cinematographers push themselves whether it is on a challenging line or getting the perfect shot inspires me to see how I can bring that much dedication to my own work.

How can we encourage more women to work in action sports media?

There are plenty of badass women working in the post-production side of action sports, look to see how they got their start in the industry as insight. Don't let gender be a barrier to whatever your dreams may be. Special shout out to Hilary Byrne who helped me get my start.


Katie Lozancich - Photographer and Writer

When I’m in the field, I photograph TGR films like Accomplice, and document events like Crankworx, Red Bull Rampage, and Kings and Queens of Corbets. The days I don’t have a camera in my hand, I curate, write and produce editorial content for TGR’s website and social platforms.

What do you love about working in the Outdoor industry?

The fact that we get to be outside! I love how photography and writing allow me to be on skis or a mountain bike in some jaw-dropping locations. On top of that, I’m often working alongside a great group of people. The outdoor industry is fueled by some of the most passionate people you can find, and it only motivates you to dream big.

Who's inspired you?

I didn’t know any female action sports photographers when I first started shooting six years ago, and I found that to be really intimidating. But over the last few years, I’ve connected with some incredible women who I now lean on as mentors. Meeting Robin O’Neill was a bit life-changing because she’s a total badass and has been hustling in the industry for while now. It showed me that if she’s doing it then I can too. Also connecting with Lisa Slagle from Wheelie Creative was huge, I definitely call her for advice every once and awhile.

I think that’s the biggest advice I can give: Find yourself a mentor!

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