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Essential Tips for Heat and SunSafety on the Farm

Summertime in the fields can put agricultural workers in danger of heat and sun-related illnesses. Farm equipment parts can also become very hot in the bright sun, causing further hazards. Thankfully, there are many steps you can take to reduce your risk of danger in the high temperatures. Use these tips when working in the fields on hot months, and pass them on to your co-workers and/or employees.

Tip one: Acclimate. As with many things in the field, progress takes gradual growth and patience. Your tolerance to the heat is no exception. If you are unused to hot conditions for extended periods, it’s essential you give yourself time to build a tolerance to the heat, increasing your time in these conditions gradually– for about a week or so, before spending full days in the sun and heat. Get familiar also with how much your farm machinery parts and products heat up, so you can practice caution around this equipment.

Tip two: Hydrate! Just as plants wilt and suffer in the sun without moisture, you will, too, if you ignore your water requirements. Even if you don’t feel yourself getting thirsty, it’s essential to keep water on hand and rehydrate 3-4 times an hour in hot, sunny conditions, especially if you’re out working during the hottest time of the day. Wherever you shop forfarm implements, tractor parts, and discs for sale, look at water bottles and hydration packs suitable for the field.

Tip Three: Don’t skip your breaks. Short breaks in the shade will not hinder productivity – in fact, taking short breaks is sure to increase your productivity by keeping you in top condition for laboring in the heat. If you can’t find a shady spot, create one with a tent or umbrella. Farm equipment suppliers where you normally purchase farm machinery for saleoften sell shades for tractors and pop-up tents as well.

Tip Four: Protect your skin from the sun. Repeated exposure to the sun contributes to skin cancer, and therefore it’s important to take the time before heading into the fields to think about sun safety and protect yourself. Before you start work for the day, make a habit of using sunscreen on all exposed areas of your skin. Additionally, protect your eyes and the delicate skin around your eyes with sunglasses, and wear a hat and protective clothing.

Down the road, you will be so glad you took these simple measures.Often you can find the right types of lightweight, sun-protective clothing at the same places you purchase farm equipment for sale orfarm machinery parts online. 

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