Sign In:

×

Last Step!

Please enter your public display name and a secure password.

Plan to post in the forums? Change your default forum handle here!

×
×

5 Places Where You Can Still Realistically Watch the Solar Eclipse

The last solar eclipse whose path of totality stretched across the continental U.S. was in 1923. That’s almost 100 years ago, so it’s no wonder everyone is losing their minds over the upcoming eclipse on August 21st. Towns in the path of totality are stocking up on basic supplies like they’re preparing for the end of the world. Here at TGR, our hometown is about to be flooded with up to 100,000 extra tourists: every single hotel room is booked, our traffic is gridlocked, and our airport is basically going to shut down. This valley has never had to handle such a ridiculous influx of people, so if you thought Grand Teton/Yellowstone would be a nice, scenic spot to watch this thing, you’re going to need to think again. 

Instead, here are five places that you could still realistically pick up and go to if you want to see the eclipse.

1. Jefferson County, Oregon

Oregon will be the first state to see the eclipse, with totality occurring around 10:21 a.m. Jefferson County happens to be right in the middle of the path, and it has lots of tiny towns you could go to. The one we would stay away from is Madras, which legitimately has a separate section on its Wikipedia page stating that all hotel rooms have been booked for two years and that they, like Jackson, are expecting about 100,000 visitors. Keep in mind that this town only has 6,000 residents to being with. Instead, take your travels to Culver or John Day. Both have relatively dry inland climates, neither have a population that breaks 2,000, and both have mountains around them that you can climb for prime viewing.

2. Nebraska

The eclipse passes straight through this state, leaving you with plenty of options. Most of the towns that will experience totality seem pretty sleepy, but Mitchell, Nebraska, appears to be among the few with a sightseeing attraction in proximity (Scott's Bluff National Monument), so we’d pick that one for your eclipse destination. At least you can go check it out during your downtime.

3. Fayette, Missouri

Fayette seems like an alright place to be. There are just around 3,000 residents, so it’s still tiny, but it’s slightly less rural than some of the other places we’ve suggested. It’s only two hours from St. Louis, and it’s got a real four-year college right in the middle of it. It’s also close to the Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, where you can kayak, fish, canoe, whatever - plus, it would be pretty cool to watch the eclipse from a boat.

4. Cobden, Illinois

Only the very bottom of Illinois eeks into the path of totality, leaving just a handful of towns in the running for this state. We nominate Cobden for your eclipse destination for two reasons: 1) it’s got some mountains hills, which is pretty rare for Illinois. Almost every eclipse expert has said that you should go “high and dry” for your viewing, so the geography of this town makes it ideal, as far as the midwest goes. 2) It has seven vineyards. Go figure.

5. Lakewood, South Carolina

Lakewood is a seriously small southern town that happens to be in one of the last places that the eclipse will pass through on its way out. However, it turns out that there are a ton of places to camp in and around Lakewood, including the huge Manchester state forest and Lake Marion. It’s also just far enough from Charleston/Myrtle Beach that you won’t have to worry too much about the obscene traffic that those places are sure to experience.

**Bonus Destination** Jackson! But only if you live here

If you’re lucky enough to live in Teton County, just stay at home. It’s not worth idling on 22 between a van with Texas plates and a shiny Range Rover for hours on end. The night before the event, stick some sloshies in the freezer, call your friends, make sure you have food in your house so you won’t have to witness what I’m pretty sure will be the Albie’s apocalypse, and then watch the eclipse from your yard or roof together. That way you can effectively tune out the invasion and still get to enjoy how awesome your hometown is. But never forget, Jackson actually sucks. Tell your friends. 

Jackson WY, Cache Creek is where we are going to watch it, just southeast of town in the Gros Ventre wilderness near east Snow King Mountain.

Oh, we’ve been to Cobbden! It was totally awesome. My sister had to write about it and you may view publisher site to read her work. So our whole family gathered and we had a perfect trip.

Play
READ THE STORY
#Vanlifer Starting to Realize Living in Van “Actually Kinda Sucks”
Up Next Culture

#Vanlifer Starting to Realize Living in Van “Actually Kinda Sucks”

#Vanlifer Starting to Realize Living in Van “Actually Kinda Sucks”

MTN. TOWN, USA — After more than a year of work and a $20,000 investment, dirtbag #Vanlifer Coy Hewitt, 24, came to the sudden realization Thursday night that living in a van "sucks ass."     The epiphany came during a 3:37 am emergency porta-potty trip in which Hewitt was forced to press his bare ass to several questionable surfaces — all in subzero temps and with only rocks and snow to use for clean up. RELATED: Mom Puzzled By Yale-Grad Daughter's #Vanlife "Instagram said #Vanlife would be

Play
READ THE STORY
Deer Over 8500’ Decide To Identify As Elk
Up Next Culture

Deer Over 8500’ Decide To Identify As Elk

Deer Over 8500’ Decide To Identify As Elk

GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK — The scientific community was stunned Friday morning after a report in the journal indicated that National Park Service biologists had uncovered the elusive elevation that deer turn into elk.  Conducted in the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem, the study put to rest longstanding questions pondered by generations of gapers regarding the approximate altitudinal relationship between deer  and their girthy-throated cousins, elk ( According to Teton Park biologist Gregor

Play
READ THE STORY
How Chris Grenier and Alex Andrews Built an Action Sports Oasis Deep in the Wasatch
Up Next Snowboard

How Chris Grenier and Alex Andrews Built an Action Sports Oasis Deep in the Wasatch

How Chris Grenier and Alex Andrews Built an Action Sports Oasis Deep in the Wasatch

Many outdoor enthusiasts have at one time or another fantasized about having an outdoor Shangri-La, a place to dream up, build, and enjoy whatever the heart desires. From private skate parks to off-the-grid cabins, for those willing to invest the time and finances, building a shred oasis can be accessible to a multitude of budgets. While the most well-known snowboard wonderland might be the DC Mountain Lab, Ken Block’s high-budget and defunct haven, over the last several years a more