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Woman Climbs Everest in Two Weeks, Breaks Round Trip Record

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On Top of the World. At 11:45 am local time, my friend and hero @lydiabradey and I summited Mount Everest (8848 meters/29,029 ft), the first climbing members to reach it from the Tibet side this season, just as the rope-fixers finished putting up the final 500 vertical feet of lines. They hugged and high-fived us as they descended, leaving us alone with our two Sherpas, Mingma Tshering and Pasang Tendi, on the summit, an incredible and almost non-existent experience. We climbed from camp 2 at 7700 meters, departing late by Everest standards at 1:45 AM, to give the rope fixers time to finish their work. No one else climbed from the north side that day. We were so fortunate to have the mountain all to ourselves. Hard to believe, still processing. More to come, time to fly back to USA, landing exactly two weeks from departure. Thank you everyone for your positive thoughts, prayers, and encouragement. I gave every ounce of my being to this goal. It is by far the hardest thing I’ve ever done. #guforit #everest #everest2019 #himaladies #climbforequality #lifegoals #sisterhood #grspiritofadventure19 : @lydiabradey

A post shared by Roxanne Vogel (@roxymtngirl) on

The average expedition to Everest takes about two months; a woman from Berkeley just did it in two weeks. According to the Daily Californian, Roxanne Vogel set the Mount Everest door-to-door climbing record on May 24th when she returned to her home in California two days after reaching the summit.

RELATED: 24,000lbs of Trash and Four Bodies Removed from Everest

But doing this marathon-like-journey in a full sprint wasn’t easy, it took some meticulous planning on Vogel’s part. To prepare, Vogel trained with coaches extensively for four months. Then to expedite the acclimatization process, she slept and worked in special oxygen-deprived chambers that mirrored oxygen levels on Everest. Vogel also works for Gu Energy as the Nutrition & Performance Research Manager and drew from her research to thoughtfully plan her nutrition to achieve a “Lightning Ascent”.

Her expedition was led by Lydia Bradey, who was the first woman to reach the summit without the use of supplemental oxygen. They were joined by sherpas Mingma Tshering and Pasang Tendi, and they opted for the Tibetan route up the mountain to avoid the deadly traffic on the Nepalese side. The northern route did pose one problem, however, because of the bad weather the team had no way of knowing if the fixed ropes to the summit had been set yet for the season. Thankfully, as they closed in on the summit, the final 500 vertical feet of rope was in place, allowing for a safe passage. On a blog for Gu Energy, she wrote “No one else climbed from the north side that day. We were so fortunate to have the mountain all to ourselves. Hard to believe, still processing.”

The 33-year-old is no stranger to mountaineering and has been climbing the world’s tallest mountains for the last seven years. Everest was the sixth mountain she’s climbed of the coveted Seven Summits challenge. Now all she has left is Mount Vinson in Antarctica, which she hopes to complete this December.

“ just as the rope fixers finished putting up the final 500 vertical feet of lines” Hahhahahahahahahahah

Then to expedite the acclimatization process, she slept and worked in special oxygen-deprived chambers that mirrored oxygen levels on Everest Seven Summits
Seven Covered Data Vogel also works for Gu Energy as the Nutrition & Performance Research Manager and drew from her research to thoughtfully plan her nutrition to achieve a “Lightning Ascent”.

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