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Unbounded: A Journey though Patagonia

It was October 2016, I was a few weeks off the PCT and already looking at other hikes I could attempt (in between submitting job-applications). That's when I stumbled upon this project, "Unbounded", here was a group of 4 travelers attempting the largely unheard of "Greater Patagonia Trail", while creating a documentary about the experience.

For those who aren't familiar with the Greater Patagonia Trail, or GPT, it is a network of trails, gaucho/arrieros paths, roads, trail-less routes, bushwacking, and rivers spanning from Puente Alto down towards the Southern Icefield. The trail currently totals around 3,000km and the full network is mapped at around 12,000km. More details can be found on the trails wiki here. Needless to say it's pretty gnarly, the trail is still growing, has no support network like the US thru-hikes, and is all at the mercy of the notoriously fickle Patagonian weather systems. 

After following the audacious project for over a year and a half, the crew completed roughly over 700km of the 3000km, and was able to produce the documentary. While ~ 700km may sound paltry to us US thru-hikers; it shouldn't... this is a totally different beast. The GPT has never been completed in a single season, and honestly, it should it be. The GPT is more about immersion hiking than thru-hiking; meeting and spending time with the people as you go, providing a deeper understanding of this unique land and culture. To hear it from a Triple-Crowner who has also completed the GPT over 2 seasons check this out.

I have had the good fortune to able to view the film, as one of their Kickstarter backers, and highly recommend it to anyone who's interested in thru-hiking, adventure, or Patagonia. It truly lived up to the expectations I had for it after keeping tabs on the project for over a year and a half. It covers not only the adventure aspect that is inherent on a backcountry trek; but it also details the lives of the locals and touches on larger themes of conservation in the region. Everyone should check it out!

The film is now touring the country with upcoming showings in Jackson, Austin, Boulder, and Hadley MA. 

You can check out a screening near you here!

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